Παρασκευή, 4 Μαΐου 2012

marilena: Chinese food firm wolfs down Weetabix for £720m

marilena: Chinese food firm wolfs down Weetabix for £720m: Majority stake in the Northamptonshire makers of the nation's favourite breakfast product is sold to state-owned Chinese company W...

Chinese food firm wolfs down Weetabix for £720m

Majority stake in the Northamptonshire makers of the nation's favourite breakfast product is sold to state-owned Chinese company


Weetabix


Weetabix is exported to more than 80 countries as well as being consumed 3.4m times a day in the UK. Photograph: David Sillitoe for the Guardian
You can't say we weren't warned. Lord Digby Jones, a former director-general of the CBI, has long cautioned that "if we don't watch out, Chinawill eat our lunch". On Thursday, it got started, with breakfast. A state-owned Chinese company is gobbling up a majority stake in Weetabix for £720m.
"I have been waking people up for years to the fact that China and India wanted our lunch, but I never thought they would want our breakfast as well," Jones, who is now a UK trade ambassador, said.
Weetabix, made in Northamptonshire and exported to more than 80 countries, is the nation's favourite breakfast product – we get through 3.4m biscuits a day.
Sources close to the Shanghai-based buyer, Bright Food, said China's second biggest food company had its sights set on taking over a string of household names. "They won't stop here," one source said. "I'd be very surprised if this was the last British brand they take over."
One City analyst suggested the cereal deal underlined the "global power shift from the west to the east".
Bright Food has already splashed out on a 75% stake in Australia's Manassen Food for more than $500m and a 51% stake in New Zealand dairy producer Synlait. Last year it offered more than £1.2bn for United Biscuits, the name behind British snacks such as Hula Hoops, Twiglets and Jaffa Cakes.
It has also attempted to take over French yoghurt group Yoplait and been linked with Campbell's Soups and Premier Foods, the company behind Mr Kipling cakes, Bisto gravy and Loyd Grossman sauces.
Jones, who admitted to eating Weetabix for breakfast every other day – alternating with porridge – said he had "no problem" with China gobbling up great British brands, but just wished that they would be "similarly open to British investment in China".
Bright Foods' chairman, Zongnan Wang, who sealed the deal with a couple of celebratory Weetabix, said in a statement that he was "excited" about bringing the 80-year-old wheat biscuits to breakfast tables across China and Asia, where western eating habits are slowly catching on as wealthier citizens begin to shun traditional rice and steamed bread.
Despite Weetabix being derided by a head chef at the Savoy as "cakes that you give to dogs", Weetabix's chief executive, Giles Turrell, said he believed there were "substantial opportunities to further grow the business internationally, in North America, Asia and beyond".
Industry experts warned that Weetabix may find breaking into the Chinese market difficult because of high levels of lactose intolerance among the population. However, Marcia Mogelonsky, an expert on food and drink at the market researcher Mintel, said there was "huge growth potential" for breakfast cereals in China, where just $665m was spent on them last year, compared with $2.3bn in the UK.
Mogelonsky said Bright Foods, which makes a huge range of products including canned meats, alcohol and sweets and even runs a taxi firm in Shanghai, had an "endless pot of money" to fund other takeovers. But she expected the company to be selective over which brands it poaches next. "I don't think it's going to be like Supermarket Sweep with them stripping the shelves of everything in a hurry."
She said Weetabix would give the Chinese a "toehold in the UK, which will open up western Europe, which will in turn open up eastern Europe and then the world," she said. "There's a whole bunch more out there they can go after."
Clive Black, an analyst at Shore Capital, said the acquisition of 60% of Weetabix was "just one example" of the "global power shift from the west to the east. It's similar to how the bourgeoisie took over from the aristocracy 200 years ago," he said.
"Asia and Latin America have got capital but lack experience and gravitas of brands – that new money is looking for old wealth. I think we're going to see a lot more of it as the old world continues to get poorer and the new gets richer."
Weetabix, which also makes Alpen and Ready brek, left British control nine years ago when Sir Richard George, whose family had run it since before the second world war, sold the family firm to the flamboyant venture capitalist Lyndon Lea for £642m. Lea, the 41-year-old son of a Lancashire hairdresser and engineer who is known for hosting parties featuring Cirque de Soleil dancers and sushi served off the bodies of near-naked women at his Californian beach house, was blasé about the fivefold return his private equity firm made on the deal. "It's been a good return for us," he said.
Lea's Lion Capital firm will retain a 40% stake in the company. Bright Foods has committed itself to safeguarding production at the Weetabix factories in Burton Latimer and Corby, Northamptonshire, where 2,000 workers are employed.
The deal came on the same day as a Chinese retailer sealed the acquisition of Gieves & Hawkes from a Hong Kong company, which bought the Savile Row tailor from its British shareholders in 2002 for about £10m.

marilena: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2012/may/02/...

marilena:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2012/may/02/...
: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2012/may/02/50-stunning-olympic-moments-munich-72

marilena: Ikea faces allegations that it used Cuban prisoner...

marilena: Ikea faces allegations that it used Cuban prisoner...: Deal to make Ikea furniture in Cuban prisons was hatched using East German trading connections, according to reports Ikea used ...

Ikea faces allegations that it used Cuban prisoners to make its products

Deal to make Ikea furniture in Cuban prisons was hatched using East German trading connections, according to reports


Ikea logo



Ikea used Cuban prisoners to make its furniture in the 80s accorcing to a report in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Photograph: Peter Morrison/AP
Ikea is facing allegations that it used Cuban prisoners to make its products in the 1980s.
The claims follow allegations this week that East German political prisoners were forced to make furniture for the Swedish retailer from the 1970s.
According to a report in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, a deal to make Ikea furniture in Cuban prisons was hatched using East German trading connections.
The agreement was signed in September 1987, according to files held in the Stasi archivesfiles, after a delegation of East German business representatives went to Havana for talks with the Cuban Interior Ministry.
Talks were held with several government officials, including Enrique Sanchez, the head of the state company Emiat which was responsible for furnishing the homes of the Cuban political elite. According to the files, the production sites discussed were "incorporated in the Interior Ministry's prison facilities".
The contract signed required Cuba to produce 35,000 dining tables, 10,000 children's tables, and 4,000 three-piece suites.
Ikea reacted to the reports, which emerged following an investigation by Swedish television, by saying it had begun its own inquiry and was keen to see the Stasi files to check for evidence and compare them with the company's own records.
A spokeswoman said Ikea "condemned the use of political prisoners" in its production "in the strongest possible terms". She added the company took the claims very seriously, though denied that Ikea knew it had been using prison labour.
The records show the collaboration with Cuba did not initially go very smoothly. In early 1988 the first delivery of three-piece suites was delayed due to poor quality. Changes to the production process led to shipments of the products resuming several months later.

guardian

marilena: How to cook perfect garlic bread

marilena: How to cook perfect garlic bread: Are you an old-school supermarket baguette fan, do you prefer a simple Italian-style toast or have you your own approach to combining clove...

How to cook perfect garlic bread

Are you an old-school supermarket baguette fan, do you prefer a simple Italian-style toast or have you your own approach to combining cloves and loaves?


Felicity's perfect garlic bread


"Anyone who says they don't like garlic bread must be fibbing" declare the authors of retro recipe bible The Prawn Cocktail Years – and, as usual, I'm in complete agreement. Hot and crisp from the oven, sodden with rich, punchy butter, it's the pleasure that never, ever palls. Even the plastic-wrapped supermarket version, pallid yet powerful, has its tawdry charms: it seems garlic butter can do no wrong.
That said, not all members of the pungent pantheon are created equal: Nigel Slater's quite outrageously good parmesan garlic bread has been closest to my heart for some many years now – and has sustained many, many house parties over the years: a burnt tongue being apparently a small price to pay for seizing the first slice from the steaming foil, especially after a few drinks – but could there be something even better lurking quietly out there in a pool of delicious grease? The Pandora's box of possibility finally opened, I can't stop until I'm satisfied I've tasted the best garlic bread has to offer me.
Felicity's perfect garlic bread
1 ciabatta loaf (Richard Bertinet has an excellent recipe in his book Crust)
100g salted butter, at room temperature
4 cloves of garlic, crushed
Small bunch of whichever parsley you prefer, finely chopped
40g parmesan, grated, plus a little extra for topping
Squeeze of lemon juice
1. Preheat the oven to 220C. Very carefully cut the ciabatta into slices, making sure not to go right through, and put it in the middle of a piece of foil large enough to wrap around it.

2. Beat together the other ingredients, apart from the extra parmesan until well combined, then gently force the butter between the slices (this will be messy, but it's well worth it). Sprinkle the top of the loaf with the remaining cheese, and seal the foil around the loaf.
3. Bake for about 20 minutes, then open the foil and bake for another five minutes, and devour as soon as it's cool enough to handle.
Is garlic bread the savoury equivalent of chocolate brownies – the food everyone likes, or is there someone out there who can resist its charms? Are you an old-school supermarket baguette fan, or do you prefer a simple Italian-style toast? And honestly, is there any such thing as too much garlic?

guardian

marilena: The Scream's price tag should make us all despair

marilena: The Scream's price tag should make us all despair: The art market has reduced Edvard Munch's harrowing insight into the human condition to a saleable plaything Edvard Munch's The Scre...

The Scream's price tag should make us all despair

The art market has reduced Edvard Munch's harrowing insight into the human condition to a saleable plaything
The Scream

Edvard Munch's The Scream has sold for $120m at auction in New York. Photograph: KeystoneUSA-ZUMA /Rex Features
I used to like The Scream. Its sky of blood and zombie despair seemed to say so much, so honestly. Munch is a poet in colours. His pictures portray moods, most of which are dark. But sometimes on a spring day on the banks of Oslofjord he can muster a bit of uneasy delight in the world. Right now, I would rather look at his painting Ashes, a portrayal of the aftermath of sex in a Norwegian wood, or Girls on a Pier, whose lyrical longing is fraught with loneliness, than at Munch's most famous epitome of the modern condition.
The modern art market is becoming violent and destructive. It spoils what it sells and leaves nothing but ashes. The greatest works of art are churned through a sausage mill of celebrity and chatter and become, at the end of it all, just a price tag. The Scream has been too famous for too long: too famous for its own good. Its apotheosis by this auction of the only version in private hands turns the introspection of a man in the grip of terrible visions into a number: 120,000,000. Dollars, that is. It is no longer a great painting: it is an event in the madness of our time. As all the world screams at inequality and the tyranny of a finance-led model of capitalism that is failing to provide the general wellbeing that might justify its excesses, the 1% rub salt in the wound by turning profound insights into saleable playthings.
Disgust rises at the thought of that grotesque number, so gross and absurd that it destroys actual value. Art has become the meaningless totem of a world that no longer feels the emotions it was created to express. We can no longer create art like The Scream (the closest we can get is a diamond skull). But we are good at turning the profundities of the past into price tags.
Think about it. Munch's Scream is an unadulterated vision of modern life as a shudder of despair. Pain vibrates across the entire surface of the painting like a pool of tears rippled by a cry. Munch's world of poverty and illness, as Sue Prideaux makes clear in her devastating biography, more than justified such a scream. His other paintings, such as The Sick Child and Evening on Karl-Johan reveal his comprehensive unhappiness and alienation that reaches its purest lucidity in The Scream.
Because of course The Scream is Munch's masterpiece and one of the supreme images of the modern world. I am starting to love it again already. But what is it to love this painting? It has to be to embrace Munch's tragic sense of life, at least for a moment to feel his isolation. The trouble with images is that their rapid assimilation means they can be reduced to caricatures of themselves. To experience Kafka's Metamorphosis – a comparable masterpiece of anxiety – you have to read it, and to do so is to inhabit a terrible experience. But someone can buy the most harrowing painting in the world, put it on their wall and perhaps never feel a damn about it. If they did understand it, they would do something more generous with the money. There is something sick about a society that treats its highest cultural totems in this hollow way, selling screams, buying the abyss. Perhaps The Scream says more about our time than we know.
guardian

Πέμπτη, 3 Μαΐου 2012

marilena: France presidential election: Who won TV debate?

marilena: France presidential election: Who won TV debate?: LATEST POLL RESULTS BVA 1 May Ifop 1 May Ipsos 28 Apr LH2 28 Apr Francois Hollande 53.5% 53.5% 53% 54% ...

France presidential election: Who won TV debate?

Polling averages show Mr Sarkozy on 46.5% and Mr Hollande on 53.5%


LATEST POLL RESULTS


BVA
1 May
Ifop
1 May
Ipsos
28 Apr
LH2
28 Apr
Francois Hollande
53.5%
53.5%
53%
54%
Nicolas Sarkozy
46.5%
46.5%
47%
46%



So who won?
It is an impossible question to answer, and every French man and woman will make up his own mind.
For my money, Mr Sarkozy clearly had the better of the argument.
He was combative and clear - fiercely fending off attacks by Mr Hollande on his personal integrity or his supposed "partisanship" in favour of the rich.
He made some telling strikes on Mr Hollande's economic programme, as well as on the Socialists' vaunted "normality".
"You speak of being a 'normal' president. But it's not a 'normal' job. De Gaulle, Pompidou, Mitterrand... these were not 'normal' men. Your 'normality' does not match the distinction of the office," he said.
Mr Hollande concentrated his attacks on Mr Sarkozy's record in office, allowing the president to appear more at grips with the challenges of the coming presidency.
And there were times when the Socialist appeared knocked off balance, as if his evidently decent self was not especially enjoying the encounter.
The Socialist did have his moments though, especially in the summing-up when he delivered a stirring peroration about how France would change under his rule.
And his mildness was in sharp contrast to Sarkozy's aggressivity - a difference which in many eyes will not have been to the president's advantaghe
"The choice is clear," he said. "To continue with you [Nicolas Sarkozy] or to change."
No knockout blow
Mr Sarkozy then concluded by directly appealing to voters for the far-right National Front - "unlike you I don't have to put a peg over my nose to talk to them" - as well as for supporters of the centrist Francois Bayrou.
To them, he held out the offer of a constitutional change mandating a balanced budget. That would be in line with the EU's controversial fiscal compact which Mr Hollande wants to renegotiate.
"It is a dangerous world, a difficult world, where decisions have to be taken, a course has to be set, responsibility has to be assumed," Mr Sarkozy said.
Nicolas Sarkozy, I reckon, won on points. But as he himself knows, what he needed was a knockout blow.
And I don't think he got it.
BBC

marilena: Greece election: New groups challenge old guard

marilena: Greece election: New groups challenge old guard: On Sunday Greece will hold one of its most critical elections in decades. With many voters registering a deep distrust of the two ma...

Greece election: New groups challenge old guard

May Day rally in Athens, 1 May, 2012


On Sunday Greece will hold one of its most critical elections in decades.
With many voters registering a deep distrust of the two major parties, dozens of smaller parties have emerged - many with an anti-austerity agenda.
But where are the election posters?
I thought I spotted one on a lamp-post. It turned out to be for a concert. The picture not of a politician, but of a soft-permed crooner.
The main parties have been keeping a low profile - keen, would you believe, not to antagonise the voters or incite trouble. Politicians are not flavour of the month.
Who runs this country, however, is the main subject on peoples' lips.
Scepticism
In a bustling open air cafe in the Peloponnesian port city of Patras, Peter Flogeris considers himself a bit of a "barometer" of modern Greece. His establishment, 52 years old and counting, welcomes a cross-section of society.
"Right now [my customers] are not trusting the top two parties. They are the ones that didn't operate the system right," he says.
The two parties he speaks of are the social democratic Pasok and the conservative New Democracy (ND).
They have dominated the political landscape here since 1975, when the military junta fell.
So it is Pasok and ND who most here blame for leading Greece into the current crisis.
Both also are the two big backers of the painful cuts that Greece is implementing in return for its multi-billion-euro bailouts agreed with the "Troika" - the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and European Central Bank.
Not exactly vote-winning portfolios. The last polls here suggest Pasok and ND will lose support in Sunday's election.
Abandon bailout deal?
One party many are expected to turn to is the newly formed "Independent Greeks".
Its leader, Panos Kammenos, a former ND member of parliament, breaks into quite a sweat as he strides energetically towards the main square in Patras.
Stopping at a cafe, he receives a light round of applause and gets an endorsement from a smartly dressed middle-aged lady standing close by.
"His solution is the only one for Greece."
The solution he is advocating is - in effect - to abandon the bailout agreement so painfully and painstakingly negotiated.
"It doesn't exist," he says.
"In Greece we have a democracy. In the democracy we have a constitution. The constitution of Greece doesn't accept this kind of agreement."
So would he rip it up? He doesn't answer that question.
Panos Kammenos campaigning in Patras

Mr Kammenos - polling around 10% - will not win this election. Nor will the other anti-bailout parties who are diverting support from the two traditional giants of Greek politics.
On other issues such parties are too far apart to form a grand coalition, but they do reflect a new mood in this weary, defeated country.
Growth is the word
Across the shimmering waters to the north lies the city of Thessaloniki.
And across a sea of blue and white Greek flags lies the man the polls suggest is most likely to be the next prime minister.
Antonis Samaras
We must end waste in the public sector, but there needs to be growth measures in the first place... We need growth to create jobs.”
"We must end waste in the public sector," says Antonis Samaras of New Democracy.
"But there needs to be growth measures in the first place. I have been saying this in Greece for two years. We need growth to create jobs."
Growth is the word now, in Greece and beyond.
Will Mr Samaras be the next leader of Greece? Most probably. Will he form a coalition similar to the current government, with Pasok? If the polls are right, that is also probable.
No change then, you might think. But it will be a coalition weakened by the emergence of the anti-austerity parties.
Weakness, some argue, would be bad for Greece and bad for the euro. Before the end of June, as part of the bailout agreement, the new government has to push through dozens of reforms, including an overhaul of the tax and justice systems. It also needs to find another 11.5bn euros (£9bn; $15bn) in savings.
If it cannot the bailout will be in jeopardy, and Greece's membership of the eurozone will again be in question.
The main parties say leaving the euro would cause even greater economic pain for Greece. Brussels fears it could threaten the very existence of the single currency.
Many here believe the new government will be so weak that Greece will have to hold another election within months.
Farmer Giorgos Dimitrios
By then the fruit on Giorgos Dimitrios' farm will have been harvested.
For now though the air is full with the strong, sweet scent of orange pollen.
It enters the nostrils as the workers push aside the branches of each tree, to find the ripest oranges, cutting them off with a sharp snip of their secateurs.
Who will Mr Dimitrios vote for? "The party that wants to negotiate again all the things with the Troika," he says.
"If the Troika won't do that so we have to leave the euro and pay the cost. If it is a cost," he adds, with a smile.


BBC


marilena: Like!...προεκλογικά εργαλεία

marilena: Like!...προεκλογικά εργαλεία: Αντί των εκπτωτικών προσφορών στην δεξιά διάταξη για διαφημίσεις του Face.....φιγουράρουν εδώ και πολλές μέρες οι υποψήφιοι των εκλογών.......

Like!...προεκλογικά εργαλεία

Αντί των εκπτωτικών προσφορών στην δεξιά διάταξη για διαφημίσεις του Face.....φιγουράρουν εδώ και πολλές μέρες οι υποψήφιοι των εκλογών.... δίπλα στις φωτογραφίες μας, δίπλα στις αναρτήσεις μας, στις μουσικές μας.....Σαν να 'μαστε φίλοι κολλητοί....

Κάντε like !!! μας προτρέπουν....

Βλέπουμε και τα like των "φίλων" .....ή τουλάχιστον την πρόθεση ψήφου τους,  εδώ χωρίς παραβάν !!!

Κανείς δεν ξέρει βέβαια μέχρι το τέλος..... πόσα θα είναι τα πραγματικά like, αυτά που θα αναδείξουν τον "νικητή" / "νικητές" των εκλογών.....

Ο Θεός να βάλει το χέρι του.....

Πραγματικά,  έχει αλλάξει όλη η εικόνα στο face.
Από κοινωνική δικτύωση....έχει γίνει άκρως πολιτική κατάσταση. Προεκλογικό εργαλείο όλων των υποψηφίων.

Φαντάζομαι πόσοι εργάζονται αυτή την ώρα σε πόστα ιντερνετικά, πόσοι εργάζονται για την αποστολή sms μηνυμάτων τις πιο ακατάλληλες ώρες....(16.20 Σάββατο) λίγο πριν σε πάρει ο ύπνος..... για όνειρα γλυκά !!!

Τεχνολογικό όργιο πραγματικό !!!

Άλλες εποχές τώρα....

Άλλος τρόπος προώθησης ιδεών, μηνυμάτων, αναζήτησης ψήφων.....

Το μόνο που έχει μείνει ίδιο...
Ίδιο με τότε.....

Η ΒΟΥΛΙΜΙΚΗ ΟΡΕΞΗ ΓΙΑ ΕΞΟΥΣΙΑ (AGAIN AND AGAIN) ΟΡΙΣΜΕΝΩΝ ΥΠΟΨΗΦΙΩΝ ΜΕ ΜΠΟΛΙΚΗ ΔΟΣΗ ΘΡΑΣΟΥΣ ΚΑΙ ΑΝΑΙΔΕΙΑΣ......

ΑΥΤΑ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΤΑ ΑΔΙΑΠΡΑΓΜΑΤΕΥΤΑ ΕΡΓΑΛΕΙΑ ΤΟΥΣ.....

Don't Like......Don't like at all....















Τετάρτη, 2 Μαΐου 2012

marilena: The latest trend among chefs: Food tattoos Michael...

marilena: The latest trend among chefs: Food tattoos Michael...: [Chef Carolynn Spence shows off some of her culinary tattoos at Bar Marmont in Hollywood.  ( Mel Melcon, Los Angeles Times  /  March  28 ...

The latest trend among chefs: Food tattoos Michael Voltaggio, Carolynn Spence and seemingly everyone in the kitchen is linked by ink.

Carolynn Spence
[Chef Carolynn Spence shows off some of her culinary tattoos at Bar Marmont in Hollywood. (Mel Melcon, Los Angeles Times / March 28, 2012)



Michael Voltaggio has no idea how many tattoos he has. The question makes him laugh. The wise-cracking 33-year-old chef is pretty well covered. The name of his restaurant, after all, is Ink. Before dinner service on a recent Friday, Voltaggio plays around with an insulated bucket of liquid nitrogen, dipping his hand in it and tossing the residue on the floor where it morphs, CGI-like, into little rolling marbles of chemistry before dissolving into wisps of smoke. He laughs like the 15-year-old kid he was when he got his first covert tattoo, a crude three-leaf clover on his ankle.

"I started getting them before they were trendy; now you can get tattoos that are nicer than most clothing," says Voltaggio, who is surrounded by employees sporting tattoos. In L.A.'s professional kitchens, tattoos, often with a culinary bent, are as ubiquitous as paring knives and just as sharp.

In the foodie-driven world of chef-as-rock-star, it makes sense that these rebellious spirits would hew to an aesthetic that helps them stand out from their uniform chef whites. As Voltaggio points out, tattoos in the restaurant industry are hardly novel, but the fact that some of L.A.'s favorite chefs have chosen to mark themselves with the very symbols of their trade, namely images of food or their restaurant logos, is worth taking note of.

And when it comes to the tattoos the chefs choose to get, the reasoning behind them is as varied as the fantastical designs printed on their skin.

Carolynn Spence, formerly of New York's hammy Spotted Pig and now executive chef at the Chateau Marmont has a slew, including a ruler on the side of her hand, along with tattoos of a teaspoon and a tablespoon. She calls this her "working-class hand."

"The first ones start out having some heavy meaning, but the more you get, it's like, 'Give me a break,'" she says. "After a point it's just art."

That's why she has a whimsical trio of anthropomorphous veggies — an onion, celery and a carrot — posing in the classic "hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil" pose. She says she was going to get the vegetables tattooed in their natural form, but when her tattoo artist came to her with the "silly" idea, she just couldn't say no.

Bruce Kalman, the culinary director for Acme Bar Group, which owns Urbano Pizza Bar, Laurel Tavern and Library Bar, among others, recently got a full sleeve of fresh produce, including a lovingly rendered ear of corn up the back of his arm.

Kalman opted for a more baroque depiction of the produce in his tattoos, which are based upon a collection of prints that his tattoo artist had of produce from the 1700s.

"I gave her my wish list of the produce I wanted — all based off of the produce I get at the market," explained Kalman, who is devoted to sourcing as much as he can for his kitchens from the Santa Monica farmers market. "In California, there's no reason you should buy produce anywhere else."

Both Kalman and Spence have sizable artichoke tattoos, her because "it's such a cool vegetable — very layered, very challenging, very rewarding," and him because "they are so big and meaty and delicious."

Voltaggio's most talked-about tattoo is of a small knife and fork on his hand. He got it on a whim with his chef de cuisine Cole Dickinson at a "down and dirty, no-name tattoo shop on the Venice turnaround," just as the pair was about to open the Bazaar by José Andrés.

"The quality of the work is not as good as the rest," says Voltaggio, rubbing the tattoo absent-mindedly. "But because of what it is, I get the most comments."

Chef Michael Voltaggio of Ink restaurant in Los Angeles

Chef Michael Voltaggio of Ink restaurant displays his tattoos.

Chef Bruce Kalman of Urbano Pizza Bar in downtown Los Angeles displays his unfinished tattoos of vegetables and fruit.

Chef Bruce Kalman of Urbano Pizza Bar displays his tattoos. The newest additions on his lower right arm are dedicated to fruit and vegetables.

Chef Michael Voltaggio of Ink restaurant in Los Angeles.

los angeles times

marilena: The Dry Cleaner to Wall St......και κάτι πολύ σοβα...

marilena: The Dry Cleaner to Wall St......και κάτι πολύ σοβα...: http://www.bloomberg.com/video/91833939/

The Dry Cleaner to Wall St......και κάτι πολύ σοβαρό !!!

marilena: Cold Feet .....

marilena: Cold Feet .....: A boy dives headfirst into Lake Starnberg in southern Bavaria in Germany. The weather is turning summery, with temeratures of up to 25 d...

Cold Feet .....



A boy dives headfirst into Lake Starnberg in southern Bavaria in Germany. The weather is turning summery, with temeratures of up to 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) predicted in some areas of the country over the weekend. But water temperatures remain cool. Lake Starnberg registered nine degrees on Thursday, so it was lucky this youngster didn't have cold feet about diving in.


spiegel

marilena: Public Eye !!!

marilena: Public Eye !!!: Public surveillance took on a new guise in Tokyo on April 29 as a pair of performers masquerading as large eyeballs paraded the streets....

Public Eye !!!



Public surveillance took on a new guise in Tokyo on April 29 as a pair of performers masquerading as large eyeballs paraded the streets. The members of the Japanese group "Medaman-Medaman" might be making a statement about a "big brother" society, but they also hope to encourage people to come and "watch" them on stage.


spiegel

marilena: Blowout !!!

marilena: Blowout !!!: A Berlin woman starts May Day celebrations out right with giant bubbles in the German capital's Mauerpark on Monday night. While many in...

Blowout !!!



A Berlin woman starts May Day celebrations out right with giant bubbles in the German capital's Mauerpark on Monday night. While many in the country use the springtime public holiday as an opportunity to party, it is also Labor Day, when many unions and political parties mobilize for demonstrations.

marilena: Human Wave.....

marilena: Human Wave.....: Swimmers pack into an artificial wave pool in Nanning, the capital of the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region of southern China, where high...

Human Wave.....



Swimmers pack into an artificial wave pool in Nanning, the capital of the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region of southern China, where high temperatures have been rather warm in recent days.


Spiegel

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Στην αρχή μπορεί να απορήσεις τι κάνουν μερικά πεταμένα χαρτόκουτα και παλέτες στη μέση μιας γκαλερί, μόλις πλησιάσεις όμως σου λύνεται κάθε απορία. Ο Λόλης μετατρέπει το μάρμαρο σε ευτελές υλικό και κατασκευάζει σαρκαστικά μνημεία των σύγχρονων πόλεων, μαρμάρινα γλυπτά μεταμορφωμένα σε συνθέσεις από αστικά σκουπίδια. 26/4 - 26/5, fizz gallery, Βαλαωρίτου 9Γ, 210 3607.598


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SONKE

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Athens voice

marilena: Bangladeshi computer whizz kid eyes record books B...

marilena: Bangladeshi computer whizz kid eyes record books B...: A six-year-old boy from Bangladesh is hoping to become the world's youngest computer expert after becoming obsessed with his mother's ...

Bangladeshi computer whizz kid eyes record books By Shajan Miah BBC News‏

Wasik farhan-Roopkotha


A six-year-old boy from Bangladesh is hoping to become the world's youngest computer expert after becoming obsessed with his mother's PC at the age of two.
Wasik Farhan-Roopkotha, who turned six in January, is hoping his skills will be recognised by Microsoft and Guinness World Records.
As a toddler, Wasik started to show an aptitude for computers and before long he had mastered several popular video games, includingModern Warfare and Metal Gear Solid.
He began typing in Microsoft Word as a three year-old and knew how to programme anddownload game emulators at the age of four.
His mother Cynthia Farhan-Risha said: "I knew he was very different since his birth. I couldn't believe my eyes when he began computing when he was just seven months old.
"Wasik started to play and master many complicated games and started installing them just after he turned two and also started typing in MS Word from around the same time."
By the time he was of school age, Wasik was not integrating at his local primary and so his parents decided it was best for him to be taught at home.
According to his mum, Wasik's English is still fairly limited. But he did have a few words to say in Bengali.
"I really enjoy playing on the computer and learning new skills," he told the BBC.
"My ambition is to be a computer expert and to work for a big computer firm in the future."
Wasik - who comes across as a very quiet young boy - has now been working with computers for more than four years, but he still enjoys mixing with other children of his age, playing football and listening to music.
However, computers are his main passion and his parents are determined that their son will not let his talents go to waste. They are hoping to get some government funding to help him fulfil his potential.
'Fantastic career'
"If Wasik receives the right support here in Bangladesh and from the best colleges and universities in the world then who knows what he will go on to achieve. I think he is in on the right track at this stage of his development," Ms Farhan-Risha says.
"My son has achieved so much already without any computer training or guidance. He has already gained some knowledge of C++, which is one of the most popular programming languages. He is also able to write sentences on a keyboard efficiently and swiftly without having to look at the keyboard.
"As a mother, I dream that in the future he will go on to become a great computer scientist and help to introduce a new episode in the cyber world," she added.
Wasik has already received extensive media coverage in Bangladesh.
"He has visited several IT institutions in and around Dhaka, who have all said positive things about his talent," his mum says.
"Although he is still very young, everyone that I have met believes Wasik can certainly go on to have a fantastic career in the world of computer programming."
'Discipline and focus'
Ms Farhan-Risha says she also hopes to get Wasik mentioned inGuinness World Records "because currently they do not have anyone listed as the youngest computer programmer in the world".
"But we will have to wait and see and as long as Wasik continues to progress then the world can become his oyster," she says.
Guinness World Records said: "We do not monitor such a record in our database at the moment, but Wasik's family is welcome to make a claim on our website."
Like many parents with gifted children, Wasik's parents say they have struggled to rein in Wasik's behaviour. He can sometimes show signs of stubbornness, but his parents hope to keep his feet firmly on the ground.
Ms Farhan-Risha explained: "Since he was very young, Wasik has tried to get his own way. For example, he wouldn't have his meals without us letting him go on the computer.
"It was awkward for us to find the right balance, but we realise that every child needs discipline and focus.
"We hope to keep him grounded and as he grows older let him know that he has been blessed with a gift which he shouldn't take for granted."

If Wasik receives the right support here in Bangladesh and from the best colleges and universities in the world then who knows what he will go on to achieve”

bbc news