Σάββατο, 2 Ιουνίου 2012

Maya Nakanishi....ΤΙ ΝΑ ΠΕΙ ΚΑΝΕΙΣ....ΜΟΝΟ ΘΑΥΜΑΣΜΟ ΝΑ ΑΙΣΘΑΝΘΕΙ !!!

Japan's disabled sprinter Maya Nakanishi poses in this handout picture featured in her calendar in Tokyo February 7, 2012. Nakanishi, who is planning to compete in the 2012 London Paralympic Games, published a calendar featuring her posing semi-nude with her prosthetic leg to help fund her training and trip to London Paralympic Games. Nakanishi lost her right leg below the knee in a workplace accident when she was 21, then became a sprinter with her prosthetic limb. She is the Asian record holder in the T44 (one leg amputated below the knee) 200 meter and long jump and she was the first Japanese woman to be at the start line in a 100 meter final race in the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Olympics. But with little financial assistance, she made up her mind to pose herself partially nude in her calendar to fund her trip to compete in London. The calendar of 7,000 copies is priced at 1,200 yen ($15) in Japan.  REUTERS-Ochitakao-Handout

Japan's disabled sprinter Maya Nakanishi poses in this handout picture featured in her calendar in Tokyo February 7, 2012. Nakanishi, who is planning to compete in the 2012 London Paralympic Games, published a calendar featuring her posing semi-nude with her prosthetic leg to help fund her training and trip to London Paralympic Games. Nakanishi lost her right leg below the knee in a workplace accident when she was 21, then became a sprinter with her prosthetic limb. She is the Asian record holder in the T44 (one leg amputated below the knee) 200 meter and long jump and she was the first Japanese woman to be at the start line in a 100 meter final race in the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Olympics. But with little financial assistance, she made up her mind to pose herself partially nude in her calendar to fund her trip to compete in London. The calendar of 7,000 copies is priced at 1,200 yen ($15) in Japan. 
REUTERS/Ochitakao/Handout



REUTERS

marilena: Paralysed rats walk again in Swiss lab study !!!!

marilena: Paralysed rats walk again in Swiss lab study !!!!: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/31/us-paralysis-rats-idUSBRE84U11G20120531 (Reuters) - Scientists in Switzerland have restor...

Paralysed rats walk again in Swiss lab study !!!!

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/31/us-paralysis-rats-idUSBRE84U11G20120531

An undated handout photo provided by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) May 31, 2012, shows a rat walking on its hind legs during an experiment at the Center for Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute in Ecublens. REUTERS/EPFL/Handout


(Reuters) - Scientists in Switzerland have restored full movement to rats paralysed by spinal cord injuries in a study that might eventually be used in people with similar injuries.

Gregoire Courtine and his team at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne saw rats with severe paralysis walking and running again after a couple of weeks following a combination of electrical and chemical stimulation of the spinal cord together with robotic support.

"Our rats are not only voluntarily initiating a walking gait, but they are soon sprinting, climbing up stairs and avoiding obstacles," said Courtine, whose results from the five-year study will be published in the journal Science on Friday.

Courtine is quick to point out that it remains unclear if a similar technique could help people with spinal cord damage but he adds the technique does hint at new ways of treating paralysis.

Other scientists agree.

"This is ground-breaking research and offers great hope for the future of restoring function to spinal injured patients," said Elizabeth Bradbury, a Medical Research Council senior fellow at King's College London.

But Bradbury notes that very few human spinal cord injuries are the result of a direct cut through the cord, which is what the rats had. Human injuries are most often the result of bruising or compression and it is unclear if the technique could be translated across to this type of injury.

It is also unclear if this kind of electro-chemical "kick-start" could help a spinal cord that has been damaged for a long time, with complications like scar tissue, holes and where a large number of nerve cells and fibres have died or degenerated.

Nevertheless, Courtine's work does demonstrate a way of encouraging and increasing the innate ability of the spinal cord to repair itself, a quality known as neuroplasticity.

Other attempts to repair spinal cords have focused on stem cell therapy, although Geron, the world's leading embryonic stem cell company, last year closed its pioneering work in the field.

The brain and spinal cord can adapt and recover from small injuries but until now that ability was far too limited to overcome severe damage. This new study proves that recovery from severe injury is possible if the dormant spinal column is "woken up".

Norman Saunders, a neuroscientist at the University of Melbourne in Australia, said in an emailed statement reacting to the study that although it remains to be seen whether the technique can be translated to people, "it looks more promising than previously proposed treatments for spinal cord injury".

Bryce Vissel, head of the Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Laboratory at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, said the study "suggests we are on the edge of a truly profound advance in modern medicine: the prospect of repairing the spinal cord after injury".

Courtine hopes to start human trials in a year or two at Balgrist University Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Centre in Zurich.

"Our rats have become athletes when just weeks before they were completely paralysed," he said. "I am talking about 100 percent recuperation of voluntary movement."
reuters

marilena: Ένα Βασιλικό δείγμα.....(το δαχτυλίδι άνετα θα το ...

marilena: Ένα Βασιλικό δείγμα.....(το δαχτυλίδι άνετα θα το ...: cnn

Ένα Βασιλικό δείγμα.....(το δαχτυλίδι άνετα θα το φόραγα!)

The Imperial Crown of India was made for King George V's appearance at the Delhi Durbar in 1911. It contains more than 6,000 diamonds and other precious stones, and is the only crown allowed to leave the country -- but it has only been worn once.

The Imperial State Crown is worn by the monarch at the end of the coronation ceremony, and at formal occasions including the annual opening of Parliament. The current version was made in 1937, and is set with some of the most famous stones in the collection, including the Cullinane II, or Second Star of Africa diamond, and the Black Prince's Ruby. The pearls suspended from its arches are said to have been Queen Elizabeth I's earrings.

Queen Alexandra's Crown was designed with eight arches, a style typical of her native Denmark. It was originally set with the Koh-i-Nur diamond, which is now in the Queen Mother's Crown -- today it is set with paste stones.

The Sovereign's Sceptre with Dove dates back to 1661; the bird symbolizes the Holy Spirit.

The annointing of the new monarch, using holy oil, is one of the first parts of the Coronation ceremony. The Coronation Spoon is the oldest of the Crown Jewels -- it survived the Civil War, and dates back to the 12th century.

The Crown Jewels collection also contains items created for banquets. This enormous gold salt cellar, in the shape of a castle, was presented to King Charles II after the Civil War by the citizens of Exeter.

British monarchs are symbolically "married" to the country during their coronation. This coronation ring was made for Queen Victoria, as the traditional one was too large. However, this version was too small, and became stuck on her finger.

This tiny crown -- which stands less than 10cm tall -- was made for Queen Victoria after the death of her husband, Prince Albert, in 1861; it was designed to be worn over her widow's veil.

cnn

marilena: Economic crisis in Greece is forcing more hotels o...

marilena: Economic crisis in Greece is forcing more hotels o...: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18304529 1 June 2012   Last updated at  21:25 GMT Help The economy in Greece and declining t...

Economic crisis in Greece is forcing more hotels out of business


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18304529

Help
The economy in Greece and declining tourist numbers means many hotels in Greece have been forced to close.
According to the Greek Chamber of Hotels, 18 have already closed in Athens, while another 80 hotels have closed countrywide.
Eric Camara reports.

BBC NEWS

marilena: 'Mr Obama, it's time to keep your word and end thi...

marilena: 'Mr Obama, it's time to keep your word and end thi...: The leader of Syria's rebel forces tells Loveday Morris why the West must watch no longer The  world  cannot continue to sit idly ...

'Mr Obama, it's time to keep your word and end this slaughter'


The leader of Syria's rebel forces tells Loveday Morris why the West must watch no longer
Getty Images


The world cannot continue to sit idly by as Syrian women and children are slaughtered, says the colonel who has positioned himself at the helm of the Free Syrian Army.
He called on the United States and Europe to create a no-fly zone that would enable rebels to establish a base for operations and provide safety for refugees.
Speaking to The Independent from an undisclosed location in the Homs Governorate, Colonel Qassim Saadeddine – who this week laid bare the rifts in the rebel forces as he denounced the leadership of the exiled Colonel Riad al-Asaad – declared the Annan peace plan "dead and buried".
In a message to the US President, Barack Obama, and the Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, he said: "You said that [President] Assad must go, you said his days are numbered. Words should be matched by deeds. You cannot wait until after the American elections for action. The regime hasn't stopped the killing, hasn't stopped the shelling – you cannot stand still."
A former army colonel from the Homs town of Rastan who defected in February, Colonel Saadeddine says he is not seeking a leadership role in the organisation, but claims to speaks for all the country's regional military councils. His disdain for Colonel Asaad, giving orders safely away from the battlefield from his base in Turkey, is thinly veiled.
"The whole world knows that a true leader is one who stays with his men and fights with them on the field and is of course not outside the country's borders," he said. "I'm a leader in the field, I fight with my men. I don't like to identify myself as a leader, but in terms of decision making my opinions are the ones that are respected."
Colonel Saadeddine rounded on the former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, saying he "didn't deserve to rule France" because had waited too long to show he was a man of his word and lost power, and implored Mr Obama not to do the same. "The US and Europe should move through an international coalition to establish a no-fly zone and buffer zones so that the Syrian people can get rid of their oppressors," he said, adding that this should be done "with or without" the support of the UN Security Council.
The formation of buffer zones or humanitarian corridors, most likely along the Turkish border, has long been mooted, and would give the Free Syrian Army (FSA) a geographical foothold from which to mount attacks. However, the international community remains reticent due to the inevitable involvement of "boots on the ground" and the distant prospect of any UN mandate.
The Security Council has been hamstrung by Russia and China's reticence to move against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. After meeting the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, on his first overseas trip since returning to the presidency, the Russian Premier, Vladimir Putin, yesterday rejected assertions that Moscow is propping up President Assad's government, but Moscow has made it clear that it will still block any attempts at intervention.
The fractured opposition does not help the case for those who are seeking outside assistance. The fault lines in the FSA were laid bare when Colonel Saadeddine released a video message earlier this week giving the regime a 48-hour deadline to comply with the terms of the ceasefire before it would consider itself no longer bound by the Annan plan. His ultimatum was rejected by Colonel Asaad and led to a sharp exchange of words.
The rift reflects similar tensions in the non-military opposition, where the frustration of grassroots movements with the largely exiled opposition leadership, has been building. Added to the FSA's difficulties is a limited chain of command, with numerous groups identifying themselves under the banner and a lack of co-ordination between ragtag militias and battalions.
Colonel Saadeddine claims that a clearer structure is now emerging, with 10 regional military councils to which local brigades and battalions are attached. All also have administrative branches that deal with financing, weapons supply and humanitarian aid. But the fact that senior FSA figures including Colonel Saadeddine claim to have been abiding by the ceasefire while the UN has condemned numerous breaches on both sides could indicate its limited control. However, any restraint that might have been exercised now appears to have gone.
Speaking just after his 48-hour deadline expired yesterday afternoon, Colonel Saadeddine said the massacre at Houla, was the most blatant evidence that Assad's regime had no intention of moving towards reconciliation. "They are attacking our women and children, do we just sit and let them kill them? The Annan plan, as far as we are concerned, is none of our business anymore. We can't stand still with our hands on our swords."



What next for Syria? The worst atrocities ... so far

4 February 2012
The start of the siege of Homs: as many as 1,000 civilians are killed within a month in the intense fighting.

10 May 2012
A suicide bomb kills 55 in Damascus. The West is alarmed when jihadists claim responsibility


25 May 2012
The most shocking atrocity of the conflict was the massacre of 100 people, including children, in Houla

30 May 2012
Days after the Houla massacre, rebels found 13 bodies in al-Qusair which had been shot at point-blank range

INDEPENDENT


marilena: The pain in Spain that threatens the eurozone By T...

marilena: The pain in Spain that threatens the eurozone By T...: http://edition.cnn.com/video/?world/2012/05/31/newton-spain-draghi.cnn (CNN)  -- If Greece was the focus of markets' angst last week,...

The pain in Spain that threatens the eurozone By Tim Lister, CNN June 1, 2012 -- Updated 0210 GMT (1010 HKT)


http://edition.cnn.com/video/?world/2012/05/31/newton-spain-draghi.cnn

(CNN) -- If Greece was the focus of markets' angst last week, attention this week has shifted to the other end of the Mediterranean.
Spain's public finances are nothing like as grim as the Greeks', but a worsening banking crisis threatens to deepen an already painful recession and endanger the future of the eurozone.
The immediate cause of the pain in Spain is the need to recapitalize the country's fourth-largest bank, Bankia -- itself an unwieldy amalgam of previously-ailing financial institutions.
The bank asked the government for the not inconsiderable sum of €19 billion ($23.5 billion) last week. The state has already pumped some €20 billion into a banking system crippled by bad debt -- much of it property-related.
Getting the Spanish banking system out of intensive care threatens to become a vicious circle. To provide further help, the government will have to issue yet more bonds - worsening its own finances. The yield on Spain's sovereign 10-year bond has risen to nearly 7%, widely regarded by international markets as unsustainable.
Portugal, Greece and Ireland had to seek international bailouts when their borrowing costs reached such levels.
For the eurozone countries, the situation in Spain is far more daunting than that in Greece. According to some analysts, while it may be deemed "too big to fail" it may also be "too big to rescue" with the resources available
According to the International Monetary Fund, Greece's GDP is $271 billion; Spain's $1,397 billion.
Professor Peter Morici, of the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, says "Spain could prove beyond Germany and other northern countries' capacity to rescue, and its collapse would spell the end for the euro."
If Greece was living beyond its means, Spain's problem stems from a property boom that followed its entry to the EU. Northern Europeans escaping to the Mediterranean beaches fed an orgy of hotel and apartment building. Many of those developments are unfinished skeletons or on sale at foreclosure prices. The banks are loaded up with the consequences of that boom and bust.
cnn





marilena: Edvard Munch exhibition to explore artist's fears ...

marilena: Edvard Munch exhibition to explore artist's fears ...: Painter of The Scream had an intraocular haemorrhage which affected his mental state and work, Tate Modern  show  reveals Edvard Mu...

Edvard Munch exhibition to explore artist's fears of losing his sight

Painter of The Scream had an intraocular haemorrhage which affected his mental state and work, Tate Modern show reveals


Edvard Munch's The Modern Eye

Edvard Munch's The Modern Eye, which the exhibition says was a reflection of the artist's fears of losing his sight. Photograph: Munch Museum, Oslo
The inner agony Edvard Munch felt when he feared losing his sight is to be explored in an exhibition which opens at London's Tate Modern this month, weeks after a version of his famous 1895 picture The Scream sold for a record £74m.
The artist contracted an intraocular haemorrhage in his right eye in 1930, at the age of 66. The blood in his eye coagulated, leading to shapes, spots and smudges superimposed on to everything he saw. Nowan American professor of ophthalmology has claimed that the semi-abstract watercolours Munch painted while suffering from the disease reveal the symptoms of his illness. His new research is to be published by the Tate, which will dedicate a room to a series of rarely displayed images in an exhibition which opens on 28 June.
Michael Marmor, of Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, said: "Munch was deeply frightened by the ocular haemorrhage. This is evident in a drawing where he is portrayed with a skull-like visage. In another drawing his hands are held to his head in the same pose of fear and anguish as the famous subject of The Scream."
The effects of the coagulated blood in Munch's eye created bird-like shapes and concentric circles, often in vivid colours, which Marmor likened to the aura emitted around bright lights on a foggy day: "It is possible that these [circles] represent a view through his resolving haemorrhage as he looked towards an electric light or the sun. He annotated many of his drawings 'electric light' or 'sunshine' to indicate the conditions under which they were made."
Other sketches show the presence of a dense blind spot, or scotoma, near the centre of his visual field. "Sometimes it was simply an opaque shape, but in one striking watercolour it became a skull covering the foot of the artist's bed. In that picture he portrayed himself with a hand covering his left eye, the better to observe the nature of the scotoma on the right."
In a particularly poignant sketch, a nude figure is obscured partially by the scotoma – expressing Munch's frustration as an artist who cannot see the core of his subject.
As the haemorrhage cleared, Munch perceived the debris in his eye as misty shadows: "Dark spots … like small flocks of crows far up when I look at the sky … which by a sudden movement or by the effect of sharp light are moved from their origin – when they suddenly disappear." Munch consulted one of the most eminent ophthalmologists in his native Norway, who concluded that the haemorrhage was caused by "over-exertion", and prescribed complete rest.
Marmor said that Munch was so fearful of being unable to paint that he spent his convalescence pursuing photography. "However, by 1931 he was again painting, and the strange images disappeared for ever from his work."
Mamor said that Munch's pictures differed in one important aspect from those by other artists with damaged eyesight. "Although the effects of ophthalmic problems such as cataracts can be seen in the works of artists such as Degas and Monet, Munch was unique because he gave us scenes from within the eye itself."
Ingebjørg Ydstie, chief curator at the Munch Museum in Oslo, added that the watercolours are a "remarkable artistic, medical and personal document".


guardian

Παρασκευή, 1 Ιουνίου 2012

marilena: Germans Learn Turkish to Promote Understanding

marilena: Germans Learn Turkish to Promote Understanding: For years, the focus of the integration debate in Germany has been on the assimilation of the Turkish migrant population into German soci...

Germans Learn Turkish to Promote Understanding

For years, the focus of the integration debate in Germany has been on the...
For years, the focus of the integration debate in Germany has been on the assimilation of the Turkish migrant population into German society. But nowsome Germans are beginning to consider it their responsibility to integrate with their Turkish neighbors -- and are going to language schools to learn Turkish.
The integration of the Turkish migrant population, stemming from the "guest...

Ergün Isik is writing on a chalk board in a little classroom in Berlin's southern district of Neukölln. It's a Friday evening in May and sunlight is streaming in through the window. His students have cups of tea and large yellow Turkish-German dictionaries on their desks.
Isik, who studied sociology at Humboldt University in Berlin, opened the language school in 2011 to meet an increased demand from Germans wanting to learn Turkish. "When I first came to Germany I couldn't even find a partner to do a language exchange with," says Isik, laughing. "But in the last five years there's been a real rise in demand. Business is booming."
The integration of the Turkish migrant population, which stems from the "guest workers" that Germany began recruiting in the 1950s, has long been a hot topic in German public discussion. Today some 2.5 million people in Germany have Turkish roots, but Turkish migrants have been accused of being unwilling to fit into German culture, failing to learn the language and remaining isolated in their own communities. The reverse side of the relationship -- whether Germans make an effort to better understand the migrant population -- has been largely ignored. But now, some 60 years after the arrival of the first guest workers, Germans are showing a new interest in Turkish language and culture.
The students in the classroom in Neukölln, where there is a particularly high density of Turkish migrants, come from a variety of backgrounds. "I enrolled in the course because I have so many Turkish friends," Ulrich, a social worker with a ponytail, told SPIEGEL ONLINE. His classmate, Hendrikje, a secretary, is in the same situation. "I'm from around here so I know a lot of Turkish people," she says. "It's nice to be able to understand more and to know what's going on."
Another student, Constanze, is a teacher at Max Planck high school in Berlin, which organizes exchange programs with Turkish schools. "I wanted to learn enough of the language to get by," she says.

Often, however, it is difficult to overcome stereotypes.  Here, women with a ..

'Bridge to the Islamic World'
Olaf Zimmermann, managing director of the Arts Council of Germany, believes that the debate about the integration of guest workers is outdated. "That issue is a thing of the past. Historically, Germany and Turkey have a lot in common," he told SPIEGEL ONLINE. "Turkey is the most important bridge we have to the Islamic world and we should have the courage to cross it."
For Zimmerman, culture and language are the most direct ways for Germans to connect with the Turkish migrant population. "Germans should learn Turkish," he says. "The very best way to lessen a divide is to learn about the culture of others, and that includes their language." He adds: "In my opinion, educators should have a basic knowledge of Turkish."
Isik, the teacher in Neukölln, also emphasises the role of culture in encouraging Germans to show a greater interest in their Turkish neighbors. He attributes a great deal of the rise in demand for his Turkish lessons to the 2005 film "Crossing the Bridge," which follows German musician Alexander Hacke (best known for his work with the band Einstürzende Neubauten) on his journey through the Istanbulmusic scene. "It's about breaking down barriers," Isik says. "Many of my students who have been in Istanbul say that the culture there was not as they expected. They were surprised to see a vibrant night life and fashionable women."
The German Embassy in Turkey has embraced culture as a go-between too. In October of last year, the embassy opened a cultural academy on the grounds of its summer residence in Tarabya, Istanbul, where it provides space for German artists to work on projects related to their experience of Turkish culture.
Social Issue
Turkish-German relations may well be boosted through such measures. But further down the social ladder, barriers remain. "Well educated, left-wing people are more open already," says Isik. "We need to find things that appeal to less educated, working-class people too. We need to find a way into consumer culture."
When Isik first came to Germany, he worked in two low-skilled jobs -- one in a lamp factory and another in a postal sorting office, where he found he had more in common with his German colleagues than they imagined. "They thought of Turks primarily as kebab sellers. But in reality they probably had a lot in common with their Turkish counterparts. I always thought: 'Hey, they should go have a barbeque together, they would probably get along great."
For some, a lack of education presents a significant barrier on both sides of German-Turkish integration. According to Isik, the assumption that some Turks do not want to learn the language is "nonsense." After all, many Germans without higher education are intimidated by the prospect of learning a new language too, he says.
Isik's experience of two men in their sixties, one a German and one Turkish, illustrates the point. The Turk, having been in the country for many years, was desperate to learn German but confessed that he found it too difficult. Conventional language courses, which rely on knowledge of grammatical terminology, do not cater to people with low-level educations.
The German man, on the other hand, wanted to learn Turkish so that he could visit his friends in Alanya, a beach resort in the Mediterranean area of Turkey that is a popular retirement spot for German pensioners. Isik remembers his first encounter with the German man, whose education was also limited. "He came into my class and I was talking about the subject and object of a sentence. He just looked at me blankly. He had no idea what I was talking about. It was really sad. We need new methods."
Starting Young

Some schemes aimed at tackling the issue of Turkish-German divides within the educational system are already in place, though. The Robert Bosch Stiftung, a large non-profit private German foundation, facilitates exchanges between German and Turkish schools. "The children work on a project together," Robert Bosch Stiftung representative Natalie Ferber told SPIEGEL ONLINE. "Often they stay in contact via Facebook or by text message after the exchange."
Some Berlin schools are also offering bilingual education. The Aziz Nesin primary school in Kreuzberg teaches pupils through both German and Turkish and aims to allow Turkish children to master German while continuing to nurture their native language. The Jens Nydahl school nearby, where the vast majority of students come from immigrant families, provides classes in both German and Turkish and also offers German courses for Turkish mothers. But such programs are sometimes the subject of criticism based on stereotypes. Last year, mass-circulation tabloidBild ran a story on the school in which it claimed that most of the families of the children were on welfare and that the school had stopped serving pork in its canteen out of respect for Muslim students.
For Isik, it is all about challenging the status quo. "When people realise you are an English speaker, they are immediately keen to use a few words," he says. "That's not the case with Turkish." His students, who laugh together at a joke their teacher has made in Turkish, are doing their best to change that.


spiegel





marilena: Caption competition: Angela Merkel and a rubber gl...

marilena: Caption competition: Angela Merkel and a rubber gl...: She's the leader of the most power country in the Eurozone, but what is Angela Merkel doing with that glove? German Chancellor Ang...

Caption competition: Angela Merkel and a rubber glove

German Chancellor Merkel jokes with Poland's Prime Minister Tusk

She's the leader of the most power country in the Eurozone, but what is Angela Merkel doing with that glove?



German Chancellor Angela Merkel jokes with Poland's Prime Minister Donald Tusk, after a penguin jumped back into the water during a feeding session at the Oceaneum at the Council of the Baltic Sea States leader summit in Stralsund. Photograph: Fabian Bimmer/Reuters
In practice, the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, might be feeding a penguin with her Polish counterpart Donald Tusk, but aren't there other uses for a pair of marigolds when you're trying to clean up the Eurozone crisis?

GUARDIAN

marilena: ΑΠΙΣΤΕΥΤΑ ΧΡΩΜΑΤΑ !!!

marilena: ΑΠΙΣΤΕΥΤΑ ΧΡΩΜΑΤΑ !!!: Dale Morris:  This shot was taken on a kayak trip up the Okovango delta in Botswana. The delta was flooded, opening the Selinda Spillway ...

ΑΠΙΣΤΕΥΤΑ ΧΡΩΜΑΤΑ !!!

BT May: Okovango delta in Botswana
Dale Morris: This shot was taken on a kayak trip up the Okovango delta in Botswana. The delta was flooded, opening the Selinda Spillway for the first time in years. The hippos, crocodiles and elephants kept us on our toes – around each bend of the river we really did not know what we would find. I marvelled at the clarity of the water and the fluffy clouds you could see reflected in the river. I positioned myself as low in the water as I could – watching out for crocs and other angry animals. I wanted the kayak to be central to the picture, to give the shot a feeling of the journey.


BT May: Burano in the Venetian Lagoon
Julia Mcilwaine: On the island of Burano in the Venetian Lagoon, houses are painted in bright colours. According to tradition, fishermen painted them in different colours so they could see them as they returned from sea through the misty lagoon


BT May: Sea view
Jacob Cockle: This photo was taken just after sunrise on a semi secret surfing location in north Cornwall we call "T Reef". I was submerged, swimming, dodging powerful waves, at the mercy of the waters – it felt like being in a room with a wild animal, one that could thow me around like a rag doll. Swimming with my camera (using a fisheye lens encased in a steel, custom-built housing) to be in the right place at the right time, I had this one fleeting moment where everything fell into place

GUARDIAN





Τετάρτη, 30 Μαΐου 2012

Artists need the freedom to be Freud

Will Britain ever produce another artist like Lucian Freud? Only if we start to value and nurture artists who upset the cosy applecart of commercialised conceptualism


Lucian Freud's Girl in a Striped Nightdress, or Celia 1983-5

Gifted artist ... Lucian Freud's Girl in a Striped Nightdress, or Celia 1983-5, which was given to the Tate by two philanthropists. Photograph: Sean Dempsey/PA
It's great news that a Lucian Freud portrait has been given to the Tate. That adds another work by this extraordinary artist to Britain's public collections. But will we ever produce another artist like Lucian Freud?
Freud came to Britain in 1933, his 11th year. What makes a great artist – nature or nurture? Freud had some impressive genes, being Sigmund Freud's grandson. You could even argue that he and Sigmund shared the same profound preoccupation with the body and sex and our fleshy earthbound natures. Lucian Freud spent his early childhood in Berlin and there is a German cultural heritage visible in his work: his paintings can easily be exhibited next to those of an artist such as Otto Dix.
But it was in Britain that he trained. Freud's most important art education was at the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing run by the artist Cedric Morris. He also spent time at London colleges but it seems to have been in East Anglia that this juvenile delinquent started to applyhimself. Morris was a self-taught artist who had been involved with British modernist art but rejected abstraction and believed in the depiction of reality. He evidently had a true influence on Freud: you can see this immediately from Morris's portrait of a dog, Belle of Bloomsbury, in the Tate collection. The relationship with Freud's own dog paintings is vivid.
The British art world in which Freud was educated and became an artist was staggeringly different from today's. Art was a comparatively minor component of British culture then: today it is constantly in the news and a source of national pride. The middle class was hostile to modernism and still held to a passion for portraits and landscapes that had dominated British art since the 18th century. Freud took all this to heart and never deviated from his path as a staunchly "traditional" artist whose power rests in craft and skill.
Again, this is very different from today's Britain where there are so many other ways of making art.
So here is the problem. Freud's death and his posthumous retrospective at the National Portrait Gallery unleashed a universal admiration for his stupendous achievement. But was that just froth? Do the British love Freud from the heart, or just as this season's fashion? If it is from the heart – if we recognise that here was a truly great talent who put lesser celebrity artists of our time to shame – then many of us need to re-examine our attitudes to art.
Since the 1990s, all through my working life as a critic, the artistic culture of Britain has done all in its power to prevent another Freud ever again being nurtured. It is as if at some point, just as Freud was reaching his zenith, a meeting was held behind closed doors at the Tate to ensure that a genius like this must never, ever be allowed again to upset the cosy applecart of commercialised conceptualism.
Everyone now praises Freud but for there to be any more Freuds, young artists need to be encouraged to draw from life (not just as wacky doodling) and to take craft as well as concept seriously. The pressures against them doing that get more relentless all the time.
Freud does not have to be the last great British painter. It is up to us to value and nurture the art we want, the art we need.
Guardian





marilena: Ireland's Test Vote on Merkel's Fiscal Pact

marilena: Ireland's Test Vote on Merkel's Fiscal Pact: All of Europe is looking to Ireland as the  country  prepares to vote on Thursday in a referendum on the unpopular fiscal compact for gr...

Ireland's Test Vote on Merkel's Fiscal Pact

High-Stakes Referendum: Ireland's Test Vote on Merkel's Fiscal Pact

All of Europe is looking to Ireland as the country prepares to vote on Thursday in a referendum on the unpopular fiscal compact for greater budgetary discipline. If the Irish reject the new treaty, it won't just be a major blow to its main advocate Angela Merkel. It could also spark panic on the financial markets. By Carsten Volkery in London 

SPIEGEL

marilena: ΤΡΕΙΣ ΠΟΛΥ ΚΑΛΕΣ.....ΑΠΌ ΤΗΝ REUTERS !!!

marilena: ΤΡΕΙΣ ΠΟΛΥ ΚΑΛΕΣ.....ΑΠΌ ΤΗΝ REUTERS !!!: A labourer rests inside the wagon of a coal train as he takes a break from shovelling coal at a coal yard on the outskirts of Jammu May 2...

ΤΡΕΙΣ ΠΟΛΥ ΚΑΛΕΣ.....ΑΠΌ ΤΗΝ REUTERS !!!

A labourer rests inside the wagon of a coal train as he takes a break from shovelling coal at a coal yard on the outskirts of Jammu May 29, 2012. REUTERS-Mukesh Gupta
A labourer rests inside the wagon of a coal train as he takes a break from shovelling coal at a coal yard on the outskirts of Jammu May 29, 2012. 


Italian artists Antonio Garullo (R) and Mario Ottocento (L) look at their exhibit entitled 'The Dream Of Italian', which comprises of a wax figurine representing Italy's former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi as being dead, at the Ferrajoli Palace in downtown Rome May 29, 2012. REUTERS-Alessandro Bianchi
Italian artists Antonio Garullo (R) and Mario Ottocento (L) look at their exhibit entitled "The Dream Of Italian", which comprises of a wax figurine representing Italy's former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi as being dead, at the Ferrajoli Palace in downtown Rome May 29, 2012.
 
Students from ethnic minorities take an afternoon nap in the shade on a blanket at the playground of a primary school in Wensu county, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, May 29, 2012. REUTERS-Stringer
Students from ethnic minorities take an afternoon nap in the shade on a blanket at the playground of a primary school in Wensu county, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, May 29, 2012. 
REUTERS






marilena: ΑΚΟΥΣΤΕ ΚΙ ΑΥΤΟ......ΠΩΣ ΝΑ ΚΕΡΔΙΣΕΤΕ ΧΡΗΜΑΤΑ ΑΝ Η...

marilena: ΑΚΟΥΣΤΕ ΚΙ ΑΥΤΟ......ΠΩΣ ΝΑ ΚΕΡΔΙΣΕΤΕ ΧΡΗΜΑΤΑ ΑΝ Η...: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/05/29/reuters-tv-how-to-make-money-if-greece-defaults-inv?videoId=235717424&videoChannel=118058 When c...

ΑΚΟΥΣΤΕ ΚΙ ΑΥΤΟ......ΠΩΣ ΝΑ ΚΕΡΔΙΣΕΤΕ ΧΡΗΜΑΤΑ ΑΝ Η ΕΛΛΑΔΑ ΠΤΩΧΕΥΣΕΙ......

http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/05/29/reuters-tv-how-to-make-money-if-greece-defaults-inv?videoId=235717424&videoChannel=118058
The Parthenon on the Athens Acropolis is seen behind a Greek and an EU flag atop the Greek ministry of finance on February 8, 2012. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
When countries default, it’s a great time to buy stocks, says David Nadel, the co-manager of the Royce European Smaller Companies fund. 


REUTERS

GUARDIAN !!! ΔΕΙΤΕ ΤΟ...

marilena: ΑΦΟΡΟΛΟΓΗΤΑ ........ΓΙΑ ΜΕΝΑ.....ΠΛΗΡΩΣΤΕ ΤΟΥΣ ΦΟΡ...

marilena: ΑΦΟΡΟΛΟΓΗΤΑ ........ΓΙΑ ΜΕΝΑ.....ΠΛΗΡΩΣΤΕ ΤΟΥΣ ΦΟΡ...: GUARDIAN

ΑΦΟΡΟΛΟΓΗΤΑ ........ΓΙΑ ΜΕΝΑ.....ΠΛΗΡΩΣΤΕ ΤΟΥΣ ΦΟΡΟΥΣ ΣΑΣ .....ΓΙΑ ΕΣΑΣ....

Steve Bell cartoon, 30.05.2012
GUARDIAN

marilena: ΈΛΕΟΣ.....ΣΩΣΤΕ ΤΑ ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΟΛΟΥ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ...ΘΑ ΠΩ ...

marilena: ΈΛΕΟΣ.....ΣΩΣΤΕ ΤΑ ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΟΛΟΥ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ...ΘΑ ΠΩ ...: With a number of the wounded succumbed to their injuries having over the weekend, the death toll now stands at 109, including dozens of c...

ΈΛΕΟΣ.....ΣΩΣΤΕ ΤΑ ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΟΛΟΥ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ...ΘΑ ΠΩ ΕΓΩ...

With a number of the wounded succumbed to their injuries having over the ...
With a number of the wounded succumbed to their injuries having over the weekend, the death toll now stands at 109, including dozens of children under the age of 10th


Demonstrations took place around the world against the slaughter in Houla ....

Δευτέρα, 28 Μαΐου 2012

marilena: ΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΑ ΤΟ ΠΙΟ ΣΥΜΜΕΤΡΙΚΟ ΠΡΟΣΩΠΟ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΓΓΛΙΑ...

marilena: ΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΑ ΤΟ ΠΙΟ ΣΥΜΜΕΤΡΙΚΟ ΠΡΟΣΩΠΟ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΓΓΛΙΑ...: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/05/10/a-look-at-the-uks-most-beautiful-face?videoId=234790523&videoChannel=2602

ΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΑ ΤΟ ΠΙΟ ΣΥΜΜΕΤΡΙΚΟ ΠΡΟΣΩΠΟ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΓΓΛΙΑ !!!

marilena: Greece needs to go to the brink By Hugo Dixon MAY ...

marilena: Greece needs to go to the brink By Hugo Dixon MAY ...: Greece needs to go to the brink. Only then will the people back a government that can pursue the tough programme needed to turn the ...

Greece needs to go to the brink By Hugo Dixon MAY 28, 2012




Greece needs to go to the brink. Only then will the people back a government that can pursue the tough programme needed to turn the country around. To get to that point, bailout cash for both the government and the banks probably has to be turned off.
It might be thought that the country is already on the edge of the abyss. This month’s election savaged the two traditional ruling parties which were backing the bailout plan that is keeping the country afloat. Extremists of both right and left gained strength – voters liked their opposition to the plan. But nobody could form a government. Hence, there will be a second election on June 17.
Will this second election express the Greeks’ desire clearly: stick with the programme and stay in the euro; or tear up the plan and bring back the drachma? That is how Greece’s financial backers in the rest of the euro zone, such as Germany, are trying to frame the debate. But the electorate doesn’t yet see the choice as that stark. Roughly three quarters want to stay with the euro but two thirds don’t want the reform-plus-austerity programme.
The next election is unlikely to resolve this inconsistency – or at least that is the conclusion I came to from a trip to Athens last week. The battle for first place is between Alexis Tsipras, the young leader of the radical left SYRIZA party, and the centre-right New Democracy party led by Antonis Samaras.
A victory for Samaras might seem to offer the hope that Greece will stick with the programme and the euro. He has, after all, campaigned for both. However, even if he comes first – which he did in this month’s election – he will not have a parliamentary majority. He will either have to stitch together a majority coalition or govern a minority government. Neither is the recipe for a strong government.
A Samaras government could theoretically deliver a positive shock by moving full-steam ahead on reforms and gaining so much credibility with Greece’s euro zone partners that they give Athens real help in turning around the country. But it is far more likely that he will be timid and the rest of the euro zone will throw Greece only a few crumbs. The economy, which has gone from bad to worse in the last couple of months of electioneering paralysis, would continue its nosedive, Samaras’ popularity would evaporate and after a few months his government would collapse.
A victory by Tsipras in next month’s election might seem even worse. After all, he will probably set Athens on a collision course with the rest of the euro zone. Last week Tsipras likened the relationship between Greece and the euro zone to that between Russia and America in the Cold War, when both had nuclear weapons that could destroy the other but refrained from firing them. Tsipras thinks the rest of the euro zone is scared that Greece’s return to the drachma would cause the entire single currency to unravel and that the bail out of Athens will continue, even without substantial economic reform.
The impact on the euro zone of Greece’s expulsion would undoubtedly be severe. But the other countries are finally preparing contingency plans to mitigate the damage. Germany, for one, will not be blackmailed by threats of mutually assured destruction.
It is conceivable that Tsipras will blink first, if he wins the election and finds he can’t shift the Germans. But this is unlikely. The typical weasel words of a politician won’t be enough to get him out of a tight spot; he would have to perform a complete somersault. It is doubtful the Marxists in his party would let him get away with this and, if they did, he would certainly lose all credibility in the country.
That said, a victory for Tsipras may paradoxically be Greece’s best chance of staying in the euro because it would bring things to a head rapidly. The country is being kept alive by a dual life-support system: the euro zone and IMF are channelling cash to the government, while the European Central Bank is authorising cash transfers to the banks. If the first tap is turned off, the government will not be able to pay salaries and pensions from July. If the second tap is turned off, the banks could run out of cash within days.
Cutting off Greece’s life support could be the trigger for reintroducing the drachma as the people found the cash machines ran dry. But it could also finally force the people to decide whether they were prepared to back reform – provided the euro zone simultaneously rolled out a proper plan to help the country. A key element of that would have to be to take over the Greek banks and guarantee their deposits, putting the country into a form of financial protectorate.
In such a scenario, a Tsipras government would probably collapse. After all, even if he comes first in the next election, he will not have a majority and so would be relying on coalition partners or governing in a minority. Greece would then need a third election, after which it might be able to put together a national unity government – perhaps even led by Lucas Papademos, the technocrat who ran the country for the last six months.
It is a slim chance full of risks, but probably Greece’s best chance of avoiding the drachma.

REUTERS