Σάββατο, 16 Ιουνίου 2012

marilena: Greek voters head to the polls on Sunday, and th...

marilena:

Greek voters head to the polls on Sunday, and th...
: Greek voters head to the polls on Sunday, and the future of Europe's common currency could hang in the balance. Investors fear that a le...
Greece Votes on Sunday: Europe's Future Hangs in the Balance

Greek voters head to the polls on Sunday, and the future of Europe's common currency could hang in the balance. Investors fear that a leftist victory could trigger Greece's exit from the euro zone, magnifying problems in Spain and Italy. Adding to concerns, depositors are rapidly withdrawing their savings from Greek banks. By Charles Hawley 



One way to look at Alexis Tsipras, the 37-year-old wunderkind of the Greek left, is as the leader of a small yet rapidly growing political party on the edge of Europe -- a party that stands to attract some 3 million votes in Sunday's election. Three million votes out of a European Union population of a half billion. Just over half of 1 percent.



There is another way to look at Tsipras, however -- as the European politician who, perhaps more than any other, holds the fate of the European common currency in his hands. It is this second interpretation that has the entire world gazing with fear as Greeks head to the polls this weekend. Tsipras, after all, has promised Greece that he will abandon the deep austerity measures imposed by the EU in exchange for bailout aid -- with Brussels threatening to suspend those payments, and send Athens into bankruptcy, should he do so. It is a game of political chicken that could bring down Europe.


Central banks around the world are preparing for the potential financial earthquake that could accompany a victory of Tsipras' Syriza party. Reuters reports on Friday that central banks in Britain, Canada, Japan, China and India are all working on contingency plans or have said they are prepared to take measures to counter any financial market turbulence that could result from the vote.


European Central Bank head Mario Draghi said on Friday that the ECB is ready to provide further liquidity to euro-zone banks. "The ECB has the crucial role of providing liquidity to sound bank counterparties in return for adequate collateral," he said. "This is what we have done throughout the crisis … and this is what we will continue to do."


Signs of Backtracking
A Syriza victory is far from a foregone conclusion. Greek election law forbids the publication of public opinion polls within two weeks of a vote, but the most recent surveys indicated that the leftist party is running neck-and-neck with the conservative New Democracy party, which is in favor of the euro bailout package and the austerity measures that accompany it. Indeed, many see the vote as a kind of referendum on whether Greeks wish to remain a part of the euro zone.
Given the uncertainty, the European Union has shown signs of backtracking on its tough love. Earlier this week, reports emerged that Brussels was considering watering down the austerity measures that have been imposed on Athens -- measures that have wreaked havoc on the country's economy. The Financial Times Deutschland cited unnamed EU sources on Wednesday as saying that a renegotiation of conditions was unavoidable if Greece were to remain in the euro zone.
French President François Hollande, however, warned Greeks this week not to count on a softening of conditions. Speaking on Greek television, he said: "I have to warn them, because I am a friend of Greece, that if the impression is given that Greece wants to distance itself from its commitments and abandon all prospect of recovery, there will be countries in the euro zone which will prefer to finish with the presence of Greece in the euro zone."


The fear of just such a scenario is palpable -- and it is largely the fear of the unknown. Nobody knows what the effects of the election might be, and it is unclear what a Greek exit from the euro zone would mean for the common currency. But it isn't likely to be good.


The 'Bank Jog'
Already, depositors are rapidly moving their money out of Greece. Capital outflows are now well more than €500 million each day, with €10 billion having been pulled out of Greek banks since early May. Analysts have dubbed it a "bank jog," but should Syriza emerge victorious on Sunday, it could turn into a trot, or even an out-and-out sprint. An unnamed euro-zone official told Reuters that Brussels is concerned about such a scenario. "It's not even about a bank run on Monday morning after the elections," the source told the news agency. "People can now log on to Internet banking and make transfers on Sunday evening, as well."
Still, even if all goes well in Greece on Sunday, Europe is far from out of the woods. Indeed, zero hour would appear to be approaching on several euro-zone fronts this summer, with both Spain and now Italy showing signs of having caught the euro bug. Not quite one week after Spain requested €100 billion from the euro backstop fund to prop up its banks, interest rates on the country's sovereign bonds have soared, and ratings agencies have slashed the country's rating. On Thursday, rates on Spanish 10-year bonds hit an all-time euro-era high of 6.96 percent, just shy of the 7 percent mark that drove Greece, Ireland and Portugal to scream for emergency aid.
Italy, too, is finding itself at the mercy of the financial markets this week. With investors more unsettled than calmed by the handling of Spain's banking crisis, Rome on Thursday had to pay 6.13 percent interest on 10-year bonds. "The European banking system is paralyzed," Nicolas Veron, a senior fellow at the Bruegel think tank in Brussels, told the Associated Press. "So many banks hold massive amounts of Spanish and Italian government bonds that are losing value. We no longer have a functioning interbank (lending) market in the euro zone."
Both Spain and Italy, in concert with France, are insisting that the euro zone must quickly come up with a plan to spread liability. Ideas supported by Rome, Madrid and Paris include the issuing of joint euro-zone debt in the form of euro bonds and/or European-wide guarantees on bank deposits. Chancellor Angela Merkel, however, has staunchly refused for fear of further exposing Germany and placing a greater burden on German taxpayers.


Pressure on Merkel
Indeed, Merkel went so far this week as to warn that Berlin could not solve the crisis by itself. "Germany is strong," Merkel said on Thursday, but the country's strength is "not unlimited."
Still, Merkel is likely to face some pressure in the coming weeks to do more to prop up the common currency. On Sunday evening, she travels to Mexico for a G-20 summit. Next Friday, she will join Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and French President Hollande in Rome to prepare for the upcoming EU summit at the end of June. In all of those meetings, she will encounter pressure to abandon her refusal to consider euro bonds and deposit guarantees.
The European Union, as reported in SPIEGEL this week, is working on a plan to outfit the euro with the kind of political union necessary to solidify the common currency. But with the crisis reaching yet another apex as early as Sunday evening, the promise of future stability might not be enough.
With reporting by David Böcking in Athens and information from wire reports

derspiegel

marilena: WHAT IF.........

marilena: WHAT IF.........: Sunday's elections: Possible scenarios What happens if the pro-bailout parties win the election? Europe will breathe a deep sigh ...

WHAT IF.........


Sunday's elections: Possible scenarios

What happens if the pro-bailout parties win the election?

Europe will breathe a deep sigh of relief, and will pledge to continue to provide the Athens government with the funds it needs.
Does that mean the crisis will be over?
Not necessarily. Greece's partners will only keep providing the bailout cash provided the new administration enacts the required structural economic reforms.

The campaign posters signal election time in Greece

What if anti-bailout parties win?

Europe and the International Monetary Fund can agree to haggle, or they can refuse to deliver the next tranche of funds for Greece.
What if Greece does not get its bailout funds?
It would not be able to redeem its bonds and will default. The country's banks will be in big trouble. If the ECB cuts Greek banks off from the European financial system, the country will have no reason to remain in the single currency.
Ben Chu
independent

Τρίτη, 12 Ιουνίου 2012

marilena: ΔΟΚΙΜΑΣΤΕ ΤΗΝ ΤΥΧΗ ΣΑΣ.....

marilena: ΔΟΚΙΜΑΣΤΕ ΤΗΝ ΤΥΧΗ ΣΑΣ.....: ΟΙ ΕΚΛΟΓΕΣ ΠΛΗΣΙΑΖΟΥΝ ΚΑΙ ΠΟΛΛΟΙ ΔΕΝ ΓΝΩΡΙΖΟΥΝ ΑΚΟΜΑ ΤΙ ΝΑ ΨΗΦΙΣΟΥΝ ...  Ο παγκοσμίου φήμης ΚΑΘΗΓΗΤΗΣ-ΑΡΙΘΜΟΛΟΓΟΣ Sir Trevoir Rigelsw...

ΔΟΚΙΜΑΣΤΕ ΤΗΝ ΤΥΧΗ ΣΑΣ.....


ΟΙ ΕΚΛΟΓΕΣ ΠΛΗΣΙΑΖΟΥΝ ΚΑΙ ΠΟΛΛΟΙ ΔΕΝ ΓΝΩΡΙΖΟΥΝ ΑΚΟΜΑ ΤΙ ΝΑ ΨΗΦΙΣΟΥΝ...
 Ο παγκοσμίου φήμης ΚΑΘΗΓΗΤΗΣ-ΑΡΙΘΜΟΛΟΓΟΣ
Sir Trevoir Rigelsworth, Ph.D, μας έχει δείξει έναν απλό τρόπο για να βρίσκουμε τι μας εκφράζει περισσότερο πολιτικά.

Είναι εύκολο, διαρκεί μόνο 1 λεπτό και θα σε εκπλήξει...!

ΠΟΙΟ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΤΟ ΔΙΚΟ ΣΟΥ ΚΟΜΜΑ;

Μην κρυφοκοιτάξεις στο τέλος!

Δε θέλεις να χαλάσεις την απάντηση.

Δοκίμασέ το, είναι τέλειο και θα σε βοηθήσει στη ζωή σου!!!!!

Μην κοιτάξεις ακόμα τις απαντήσεις...
  
Ερωτήσεις...
1) Επίλεξε τον αγαπημένο σου αριθμό από το 1 ως το 9.

2) Πολλαπλασίασε το με το 3.

3) Πρόσθεσε 3, και μετά πολλαπλασίασε πάλι με το 3.

(θα περιμένω να φέρεις το κομπιουτεράκι...)

4) Ο αριθμός που βρήκες αποτελείται από 2 ή 3 ψηφία.

5) Πρόσθεσε τα ψηφία του αριθμού που βρήκες μεταξύ τους,

ώστε να καταλήξεις σε μονοψήφιο αριθμό.
  
 Τώρα διάβασε παρακάτω τις απαντήσεις.
  
Με τον αριθμό που βρήκες, δες ποιο είναι το ΚΟΜΜΑ σου από την παρακάτω λίστα:
Λίστα με τα αποτελέσματα...
1. ΚΚΕ Μ-Λ

2. ΚΟΜΜΑ ΟΙΚΟΛΟΓΩΝ

3. ΑΝΕΞΑΡΤΗΤΟΙ ΕΛΛΗΝΕΣ

4. ΧΡΥΣΗ ΑΥΓΗ

5. ΝΕΑ ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΑ

6. ΣΥΡΙΖΑ

7. ΛΑΟΣ

8. ΚΚΕ

9. ΠΑΣΟΚ

10. ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΚΗ ΣΥΜΜΑΧΙΑ
Συμπέρασμα...
Ο ΚΛΑΣΙΚΟΣ Ο ΜΑΛΑΚΑΣ Ο ΕΛΛΗΝΑΣ (που λέει κι ο Γ.Γ.)....

 
ΠΛΗΡΩΝΕ ΤΩΡΑ ΚΑΙ ΜΗ ΜΙΛΑΣ!!!

* Υ.Γ. Σταμάτα να διαλέγεις διαφορετικά νούμερα!!!





marilena: ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ.....ΣΑΝ ΤΑ ΔΙΚΑ ΜΑΣ....

marilena: ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ.....ΣΑΝ ΤΑ ΔΙΚΑ ΜΑΣ....: REUTERS

ΠΑΙΔΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ.....ΣΑΝ ΤΑ ΔΙΚΑ ΜΑΣ....



Boys pan for gold on a riverside at Iga Barriere, 25 km (15 miles) from Bunia, in the resource-rich Ituri region of eastern Congo February 16, 2009. REUTERS-Finbarr O'Reilly

A boy yawns as he waits for customers at his roadside apple stall in Kabul August 6, 2008. REUTERS-Adnan Abidi

Waste collector Dinesh Mukherjee, 11, uses a magnet attached to a wooden stick to collect pieces of loose metal at the Ghazipur landfill in New Delhi November 10, 2011.    REUTERS-Atish Patel

Twelve-year-old Nepalese, Sirjan Rai, rests on the mountain footpath while carrying goods towards Dingboche, Nepal, April 30, 2011. Earning approximately 3000 Rupees ($66) per month, Sirjan helps works as a porter to help provide for his family in Pangboche.   REUTERS-Laurence Tan

An Indian child laborer arranges bricks at a brick factory in Tharvai village, about 35 km (22 miles) from the northern Indian city of Allahabad, February 21, 2006.   REUTERS-Jitendra Prakash

Czoton, 7, works at a balloon factory on the outskirts of Dhaka November 23, 2009. About 20 children are employed at the factory and most of them work for 12 hours a day. The weekly wage is 150 taka ($2.14) for the children. REUTERS-Andrew Biraj

A child worker picks coffee beans from coffee plants at a plantation in El Paraiso, Honduras, February 4, 2011.  REUTERS-Edgard Garrido

Siddiqullah,12, carries a basket of potatoes to nearby vegetable and fruit vendors in Karachi September 27, 2009. REUTERS-Akhtar Soomro

Child laborers sit on their wheelbarrows while waiting for work at a local market early in the morning in Abbottabad, Pakistan, May 19, 2011. REUTERS-Akhtar Soomro

Riffat, 8, splashes water on his face as he works at a vehicle spare parts store in Dholaikhal, Dhaka February 29, 2012.   REUTERS-Andrew Biraj

Tota Miya, 10, shows his hands after preparing soil to make bricks in a brick field on the outskirts of Dhaka November 21, 2009.   REUTERS-Andrew Biraj

A boy carries rubbish for recycling outside Kabul December 15, 2010. About 1.2 million Afghan children carry out part or full time work, the government says, in a country where war, poverty, widespread unemployment and a preference for large families have created a huge underage labor market.    REUTERS-Omar Sobhani

A boy works at a brick-making factory outside Kabul July 15, 2010. Laborers, most of whom work barefoot and without gloves, earn from $3 to $8 a day depending on their working hours and the number of bricks they make. REUTERS-Ahmad Masood

Afghan boy Abdul Wahab works in a blacksmith's shop in Kabul December 14, 2010.   REUTERS-Omar Sobhani

Josue Alexander Chavez, 9 years old, carries a hammer as his father Mario Chavez gathers stones near the road to Mazatenango, about 165 km (102 miles) north of Guatemala City, June 11, 2012.   REUTERS-Jorge Dan Lopez

Josue Alexander Chavez, 9 years old, uses a hammer to break stones as he works near the road to Mazatenango, about 165 km (102 miles) north of Guatemala City, June 11, 2012.   REUTERS-Jorge Dan Lopez

A girl covers her face near the road to Mazatenango, where she fills holes in the road with earth in exchange for money, about 165 km (102 miles) north of Guatemala City, June 11, 2012. REUTERS-Jorge Dan Lopez

Seven year old Wasim works in a bakery workshop on outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, May 10, 2012. REUTERS-Andrew Biraj

Naser, 7, works at a metal workshop which makes propellers for ships at a ship-building yard next to Buriganga River in Dhaka, January 8, 2012. REUTERS-Andrew Biraj

REUTERS

marilena: REUTERS ....Ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα.....Έλεος

marilena: REUTERS ....Ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα.....Έλεος: Myanmar Rohingya people ride in a rickshaw on a road north of the town of Sittwe May 18, 2012. Some 800,000 Rohingya live in Myanmar's no...

REUTERS ....Ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα.....Έλεος

Myanmar Rohingya people ride in a rickshaw on a road north of the town of Sittwe May 18, 2012. Some 800,000 Rohingya live in Myanmar's northern Rakhine State under severe government restrictions that human rights monitors believe has fuelled the current violence between predominantly Buddhist and Muslim communities that left a number of dead and houses burnt on both sides. Stateless Rohingya cannot freely travel or marry and have limited access to education and healthcare. The Rohingya are descended from South Asians and speak a regional dialect of Bengali. Most are stateless, recognised as citizens neither by Myanmar nor neighbouring Bangladesh.   REUTERS-Damir Sagolj
Myanmar Rohingya people ride in a rickshaw on a road north of the town of Sittwe May 18, 2012. Some 800,000 Rohingya live in Myanmar's northern Rakhine State under severe government restrictions that human rights monitors believe has fuelled the current violence between predominantly Buddhist and Muslim communities that left a number of dead and houses burnt on both sides. Stateless Rohingya cannot freely travel or marry and have limited access to education and healthcare. The Rohingya are descended from South Asians and speak a regional dialect of Bengali. Most are stateless, recognised as citizens neither by Myanmar nor neighbouring Bangladesh. 

marilena: Exclusive - Euro zone discussed capital controls i...

marilena: Exclusive - Euro zone discussed capital controls i...: By  Luke Baker BRUSSELS - European finance officials have discussed limiting the size of withdrawals from ATM machines, imposing bord...

Exclusive - Euro zone discussed capital controls if Greece exits euro -sources

A woman makes her way by as people make a transaction at an ATM machine outside a National Bank branch in central Athens May 29, 2012.  REUTERS/John Kolesidis

BRUSSELS - European finance officials have discussed limiting the size of withdrawals from ATM machines, imposing border checks and introducing euro zone capital controls as a worst-case scenario should Athens decide to leave the euro.

(Reuters) - European finance officials have discussed limiting the size of withdrawals from ATM machines, imposing border checks and introducing euro zone capital controls as a worst-case scenario should Athens decide to leave the euro.
EU officials have told Reuters the ideas are part of a range of contingency plans. They emphasised that the discussions were merely about being prepared for any eventuality rather than planning for something they expect to happen - no one Reuters has spoken to expects Greece to leave the single currency area.
But with increased political uncertainty in Greece following the inconclusive election on May 6 and ahead of a second election on June 17, there is now an increased need to have contingencies in place, the EU sources said.
The discussions have taken place in conference calls over the past six weeks, as concerns have grown that a radical-left coalition, SYRIZA, may win the second election, increasing the risk that Greece could renege on its EU/IMF bailout and therefore move closer to abandoning the currency.
No decisions have been taken on the calls, but members of the Eurogroup Working Group, which consists of euro zone deputy finance ministers and heads of treasury departments, have discussed the options in some detail, the sources said.
Belgium's finance minister, Steve Vanackere, said at the end of May that it was a function of each euro zone state to be prepared for problems. These discussions have been in that vein, with the specific aim of limiting a bank run or capital flight.
As well as limiting cash withdrawals and imposing capital controls, they have discussed the possibility of suspending the Schengen agreement, which allows for visa-free travel among 26 countries, including most of the European Union.
"Contingency planning is underway for a scenario under which Greece leaves," one of the sources, who has been involved in the conference calls, said. "Limited cash withdrawals from ATMs and limited movement of capital have been considered and analysed."
Another source confirmed the discussions, including that the suspension of Schengen was among the options raised.
"These are not political discussions, these are discussions among finance experts who need to be prepared for any eventuality," the second source said. "It is sensible planning, that is all, planning for the worst-case scenario."
The first official said it was still being examined whether there was a legal basis for such extreme measures.
"The Bank of Greece is not aware of any such plans," a central bank spokesman in Athens told Reuters when asked about the sources' comments.
The vast majority of Greeks - some surveys have indicated 75 to 80 percent - like the euro and want to retain the currency, something Greek politicians are aware of and which may dissuade them from pushing the country too close to the brink.
However, SYRIZA is expected to win or come a strong second on June 17. Alexis Tsipras, the party's 37-year-old leader, has said he plans to tear up or heavily renegotiate the 130-billion-euro bailout agreed with the European Union and International Monetary Fund. The EU and IMF have said they are not prepared to renegotiate.
If those differences cannot be resolved, the threat of the country leaving or being forced out of the euro will remain, and hence the need for contingencies to be in place.
Switzerland said last month it was considering introducing capital controls if the euro falls apart.
In a conference call on May 21, the Eurogroup Working Group told euro zone member states that they should each have a plan in place if Greece were to leave the currency.
Belgium's Vanackere said two days after that call that it was a basic function of each euro zone member state to be prepared for any eventuality.
"All the contingency plans (for Greece) come back to the same thing: to be responsible as a government is to foresee even what you hope to avoid," he told reporters.
"We must insist on efforts to avoid an exit scenario but that doesn't mean we are not preparing for eventualities."
REUTERS






Δευτέρα, 11 Ιουνίου 2012

marilena: And now a little something for the ladies.....

marilena: And now a little something for the ladies.....: And now a little something for the ladies.  The 2012 European Football Championship promises to serve up a fine show of sportsmanship....

And now a little something for the ladies.....

And now a little something for the ladies. The 2012 European Football...

And now a little something for the ladies. 


The 2012 European Football Championship promises to serve up a fine show of sportsmanship. But amid all the sweat and glory viewers should keep a lookout for a few certain sportsmen, too. 


Among the most obvious choices is 26-year-old German striker Mario Gomez.

spiegel



marilena: ΙΣΠΑΝΙΚΗ ΥΠΟΧΩΡΗΣΗ.......

marilena: ΙΣΠΑΝΙΚΗ ΥΠΟΧΩΡΗΣΗ.......: A ringside view of calamity Chris Riddell on David Cameron and Angela Merkel's reaction to Spain's economic agony... observe...

ΙΣΠΑΝΙΚΗ ΥΠΟΧΩΡΗΣΗ.......

Chris Riddell 10/06/2012


A ringside view of calamity


Chris Riddell on David Cameron and Angela Merkel's reaction to Spain's economic agony...

observer

marilena: Jenny Saville: 'I want to be a painter of modern l...

marilena: Jenny Saville: 'I want to be a painter of modern l...: Massively disturbing: the painter Jenny Saville, photographed in her Oxford studio, June 2012. Photograp...

Κυριακή, 10 Ιουνίου 2012

Jenny Saville: 'I want to be a painter of modern life, and modern bodies' Jenny Saville's nudes are firmly in the vein of Lucian Freud, yet only now is she having her first major British solo show • Jenny Saville's work - in pictures

Saville: Red Stare Head I, 2007-2011

Saville: Reproduction drawing III (after the Leonardo cartoon), 2009-10

Saville: Entry, 2004-2005

Saville: Atonement Studies: Central Panel (Rosetta), 2005-06

Jenny Saville: Reverse, 2003

Saville: Study for Isis and Horus, 2011

Jenny Saville: Rubin's Flap, 1999

Saville: Stare (drawing), 2006-2010


Saville: Artist Jenny Saville in her Oxford studio

 Jenny Saville in her Oxford studio


Massively disturbing: the painter Jenny Saville, photographed in her Oxford studio, June 2012. Photograph: Pal Hansen for the Observer
I have a low-level dread of artists' studios, which tend to be full to overflowing with the (to me) highly distressing detritus of creativity: encrusted paint; cruelly abandoned canvases; ghostly dustsheets. But I find that I can just about cope with Jenny Saville's work space, which is in a shabby office building in Oxford, owned by Pembroke College.
For one thing, its scale works against claustrophobia; though she has had to remove ceiling tiles in a few places, the better to accommodate the taller of her paintings, it is nevertheless as big as a small supermarket. For another, it is divided, albeit haphazardly, into zones – broken-backed art books here, shrunken tubes of paint there – with a few feet of clear floor between. As we settle down with our mugs of Earl Grey tea, the spring rain fizzing against the windows, the feeling is almost – if not quite – cosy.
Only then, out of the corner of my eye, I see it. A portrait: a woman, her neck at a difficult angle, her head tipped back, her unseeing eyes a pair of cloudy marbles (I know without being told that the model who sat for this work is blind). Now I'm not so cosy. The trick of the painting, the reason it is so hard to pull one's gaze from it, lies with the way it captures its subject's extrasensory watchfulness. She is sightless, and yet you feel, somehow, that she sees right into you. Art critics, anxious to emphasise the resonance or beauty of a particular work, have a tendency to exaggerate. They will tell you, for instance, that a canvas seems almost to vibrate, such is its power. But this painting moves well beyond vibration. No superlative I can think of seems to do it justice. It's uncanny. If I heard its subject softly breathing, I would hardly be surprised.
A painting similar to this one – I find out much later that the girl in question is called Rosetta; she lives in Naples, and was so determined not to be on the receiving end of pity she interviewed Saville at length before agreeing to sit for her – will star in the forthcoming retrospective of Saville's work at Modern Art Oxford, the artist's first solo show in a British public gallery. (It tells you a lot about contemporary art – its whims and its desires, its peculiar snobberies and its deranged hierarchy – thatDamien Hirst, whose work appeared alongside Saville's at the Royal Academy's Sensation show in 1997, is having his first solo public gallery show at the rather more grand Tate Modern; but we will come back to him.) Will Rosetta, part of Saville's Stare series, have the same effect in its pristine galleries? Almost certainly, though she will also have competition. Saville's work – she remains best known for her voluminous and unsparing early nudes – is nothing if not startling.
"There's a painting called Fulcrum," she says. "I used to call it The Bitchwhen I was making it, because it was so difficult to move about. But when I saw it again [recently], even I was shocked by how big it is." She shakes her head, mournfully. "I'm sort of impressed that I once had that sort of energy. The drive I must have had. I can't believe I was only 21. That's so young, and yet I was so determinedly serious about making art." Her voice runs on. "It's cathartic, too, though, seeing these paintings again. When you're in your studio, you've got so much work around you, you don't always see an individual piece for what it is. You think: 'Oh, so that's what I was doing.' Not that I can say I'm hugely looking forward to it [the opening]. I mostly see failings in the work – which is normal, isn't it?"
Has her confidence grown in the years since Sensation? "No, not at all. The older you get, the more doubtful you become, though I mean that in a good way. It's like being an athlete. You get quite fit on your toes when you're really pushing. But then you finish a piece, and you have to start all over again. On the other hand, I don't have anything like the traumas I used to have, throwing paintbrushes or whatever. I used only to work on one piece at a time, and that's where the trauma came. Now I move between paintings. When I start getting a bit dogmatic, I switch."
I look around the studio. From where I'm sitting, I can see no fewer than six canvases carefully arranged against the wall (not Rosetta, though; I have my back to her, so I can concentrate). Are these all works in progress? "Most of them, yes." She eyes them, warily. "It is odd to be showing in Britain. I've been shown a lot in America; that's my favourite place to show. We're quite conceptually driven in Britain. There's less guilt about being a painter over there."
Does she feel guilty? Surely not. People have talked of her, reverentially, as the heir to Lucian Freud pretty much since she left art school. "No, I don't. Not at all. Painting is my natural language. I feel in my own universe when I'm painting. But, in Britain, there has been a drive in art schools to describe and to rationalise what it is that you're making, and that is a death knell to painting. Painting doesn't operate like that. It works on all the irrational things. If you stand in front of Willem de Kooning's Woman, I, you can't unravel with words how that works on you. In America, painting is embraced, perhaps because one of the last great moments of painting was in New York, with de Kooning and Pollock."
She hesitates. "I'm not anti conceptual art. I don't think painting must be revived, exactly. Art reflects life, and our lives are full of algorithms, so a lot of people are going to want to make art that's like an algorithm. But my language is painting, and painting is the opposite of that. There's something primal about it. It's innate, the need to make marks. That's why, when you're a child, you scribble."
Jenny Saville was born in Cambridge in 1970, one of four children. She knew early on that she wanted to be an artist. "I was conscious of it as an idea from about the age of seven," she says. Her parents were both in education and, when it came to creativity, were encouraging. "We had this big old house, and in a corridor downstairs, there was this weird cupboard. I kept nosying around it, and eventually my mother gave it to me: it became my first studio, and no one else was allowed in. I would wake up every morning, and I just couldn't wait to get in that room, because I always had something on the go."
Later, she was encouraged by her uncle, an art historian, to whom she remains close (he lives near her studio in Oxford; they like to eat lunch together, and talk about Prussian blue). "When I was about 11, he gave me a section of hedge, and told me to observe it for a whole year. So I did, and I learnt such a lot about how nature shifts, and the necessity to really look."
She sees my face. "It wasn't weird at the time! It's only weird when I tell other people. I'm so grateful to him. Later on, he took me to Venice, and it wasn't just that he said this is Titian, and this is Tintoretto, or whatever. At six o'clock one morning, we went to draw at the fish market at the Rialto bridge. Great art wasn't something far away; it was part of life. We would go and drink in the same bar Rembrandt drank in; it was as fundamental as that in terms of the working life of the artist. All this helped me so much. I never questioned my ambition. I never thought: I'm a girl, I can't do this. It was only when I got to art school that I realised that the great artists of the past were not women. I had a sort of epiphany in the library: where are all the women? Only then, as the truth dawned, did I start to feel pissed off."
She went to Glasgow School of Art, an institution that instilled in her an "amazing" work ethic, and which set great store by life drawings; students had to produce 36 such sketches a term, and dedicate the hours between 7pm and 9pm every day to working with a model, even if their interests lay with abstract art.
Saville believes this gave her a kind of freedom. "Picasso wouldn't be Picasso without his academic training. That's why he nails it. The wildest distortions stand up, even if they're crazy. The point is that destruction is fundamental to the process; without it, you never get anywhere interesting. But fundamental to that is knowing what you can excavate from the destruction."
At Glasgow, she won every award going, among them a six-month scholarship to Cincinnati University, where she was captivated – if this is the right word – by the sight of obese women at shopping malls. It was these women who inspired her 1992 graduate show and who, in their turn, caught the eye of the collector Charles Saatchi – though her interest in flesh was hardly a new thing. As a little girl, she found the sight of liver turning from puce to grey-green in the pan "thrilling". She remembers, too, sitting on the floor, aged about six, and looking up at her piano teacher's thighs under her tweed skirt; they rubbed together as she played. "I was fascinated by the way her two breasts would become one, the way her fat moved, the way it hung on the back of her arms."
After tracking down and buying up the work already sold at her degree show – this was how he came by two of her most famous paintings,Branded and Propped – Saatchi then commissioned her to spend two years working on pieces to be shown at his own gallery in Young British Artists III.
"I think everyone has their squabbles with Charles," she says, now. "That's the nature of the situation. But the marriage of a new generation of artists from all kinds of backgrounds with this man who wasn't from the establishment… You have to understand that he energised a whole generation, and he engaged Britain in contemporary art. He had the money, and he said: make whatever you want.
"I was only 22; it was a dream come true. I can't say anything bad about Charles because I'm so glad he was there. Suddenly I didn't have to wait until I was 45 to be at a certain gallery. I'm 42, and I'm still younger than de Kooning was when he had his first show. It's incredible how much has changed in 20 years, and quite a lot of that is down to Charles. When I graduated I would have been hard pressed to think of a single woman who showed in a museum, and now women are directors, curators…" Her voice trails off. She can't go on, I think, because the unavoidable truth is that there are still relatively few women artists who are deemed worthy of museum exhibitions.
Am I right? She doesn't answer, or not directly. "When my show opened at the Saatchi gallery, I met David Sylvester [the art critic, who died in 2001] at the door. In the end, we became great friends. But on that day, he said: 'I always thought women couldn't be painters.' Later, I asked him why, and he said: 'I don't know. That's just the way it has always been. That's how it is.' He was right, but I think it's beginning to shift, now. Apart from anything else, there's been a sea change in what we consider to be the canon. Tracey Emin's quilts are art, whereas in the Sixties, they would have been deemed to be craft."
To coincide with her retrospective, Saville will be putting two pieces in the Renaissance gallery at the Ashmolean Museum. "I was standing there the other day, and it's full of nude women all painted by men. I'm the first woman to show in the room, which is great, but it's also obscene." She pauses. "Actually, it's not even obscene. It's just… silly."
In 1994 Saville returned to the US to observe operations at the clinic of a New York plastic surgeon. She then painted women with the surgeon's black markings on the contours of their bodies, so that they resembled living, breathing dartboards. This led in turn to Closed Contact, a series of photographs by the fashion photographer, Glen Luchford, of Saville's naked body pressed against Perspex and shot from below (Saville fattened herself up for this, the better that her flesh appear squashed and distorted). The subtext of this work is, of course, familiar now. But it wasn't at the time.
"When I made Plan [showing the lines drawn on a woman's body to designate where liposuction would be performed], I was forever explaining what liposuction was. It seemed so violent then. These days, I doubt there's anyone in the western world who doesn't know what liposuction is. Surgery was a minority sport; now that notion of hybridity is everywhere. There's almost a new race: the plastic surgery race."
These experiences, however, have cast a long shadow. She is still interested in the idea that many people hold fast to a notion that their natural self isn't the "real" them, and her work continues to be preoccupied by what she calls a sense of in-betweenness. "That's why transsexuals and hermaphrodites have become interesting to me. I want to be a painter of modern life, and modern bodies, those that emulate contemporary life, they're what I find most interesting."
More recently, she has been inspired by motherhood (she has two small children). "People told me [before I had children] that I wouldn't be able to engage with my work in the same way once they were born." Which people? Were they women? "No!" She laughs. "They were guys. Anyway, they were wrong. I enjoy the work 10 times more now. It's still a necessity to me, something I have to do. But I'm more carefree. Partly, it's watching them – the total freedom they have, scribbling across paper, the way they paint without any need for form. I thought: I fancy a bit of that myself."
Since they were born, she has produced a series of drawings, Reproduction, which nod to nativity sketches by Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo but are informed by her own experiences – a friend photographed her as she gave birth – so that mother and child are viscerally connected rather than soppily idealised. (Just so there is no misunderstanding, Saville is naked in these drawings, and the baby in her arms is lain on a belly swollen with a child yet to be born.)
Before I leave, we walk the studio, looking at the work that is still in progress (Saville is remarkably cool about this; only one canvas is turned to the wall to protect it from my gaze). "In these pieces, I'm trying to get simultaneous realities to exist in the same image," she says. "The contradiction of a drawing on top of a drawing replicates the slippage we have between the real world and the screen world. But it's about the memory of pictures, too. I'm directly referencing other artists: Manet, Titian, Picasso, Giorgione." If she has any sense of the daring involved in this – the sheer chutzpah of it – she isn't letting on. How does she know when something is finished? "When it starts to breathe, then I'm on the home straight."
We talk, too, about other people's work. She loved both Gerhard Richterat Tate Modern and Lucian Freud at the National Portrait Gallery. "It's sad he [Freud] is not going to make any more paintings," she says. "But I'm trying to work out whether he can be seen as a great artist, or whether he is a great portrait painter. I mean, why shouldn't he be a great artist? But then you look at Richter, and you wonder. Richter is definitely a great artist in the fullest sense of the word."
What about Damien Hirst? Has she seen his show yet? "No, but I will." I don't ask her what she thinks about him, but she tells me all the same, in her straightforward way. "I can tell you exactly the moment my feelings about him changed," she says. "He was the most brilliant artist right up until the time [2006] when he did this homage to Bacon at the Gagosian [A Thousand Years & Triptychs]. He did these vitrines, which I felt were dreadful. His work has become much more about the mechanisms of the art world than the art itself, and that must be quite a lonely planet for Damien to exist on. It's as if he has beaten his own horse. It's like the soul has gone."
Will this ever happen to her? At the start of the 21st century, she was, after all, one of the most expensive contemporary artists in the world. But, no. Of course it won't. Her life is here, in the studio. Even as we talk, and she is good talker, I can feel a part of her itching to get back to work. "I like all the bits up to hanging a show, and then I disengage," she says. "I don't even know my own collectors. All the razzmatazz: the market, the auctions. I'm quite immune to it. I know it's part of the process. But when you get in the studio, none of that will help you to make a better painting."
guardian



marilena: World Naked Bike Ride – in pictures Cyclists in ci...

marilena: World Naked Bike Ride – in pictures Cyclists in ci...: guardian

World Naked Bike Ride – in pictures Cyclists in cities around the world have taken part in the World Naked Bike Ride. Started in 2004, the clothing-optional protest aims to promote cycling as a greener mode of transportation, and encourage a body-positive culture. San Francisco, London, Madrid, Amsterdam and Guadalajara were among the cities that took part this year

Nude Cyclists: Madrid, Spain: The protest asks authorities to provide safer cycling routes

Nude Cyclists: London, UK: Naked cyclists ride near Hyde park corner

Nude Cyclists: Madrid, Spain: Cyclists ride nude through the city centre

Nude Cyclists: Madrid, Spain: Cyclists ride nude through the city centre

Nude Cyclists: Guadalajara, Mexico: Naked cyclists take part

Nude Cyclists: California, US: Naked cyclists take a break on Lombard Street

Nude Cyclists: London, UK: Naked cyclists gather in Hyde Park before setting off

Nude Cyclists: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Dutch cyclists take part in the naked ride

Nude Cyclists: California, US: Naked cyclists negotiate the hairpin turns

guardian

marilena: Spaniards angry over bank bailout.....

marilena: Spaniards angry over bank bailout.....: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/06/10/spaniards-angry-over-bank-bailout?videoId=235911241&videoChannel=1

Spaniards angry over bank bailout.....

marilena: HELP !!!.............

marilena: HELP !!!.............: INDEPENDENT

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