Σάββατο, 21 Ιουλίου 2012

marilena: Gunman turns movie into surreal horror: 'This is r...

marilena: Gunman turns movie into surreal horror: 'This is r...: Movie fans watching "Dark Knight Rises" in a Colorado cinema at first thought gunfire was a special effect. But then people started collap...

marilena: Gunman turns movie into surreal horror: 'This is r...

marilena: Gunman turns movie into surreal horror: 'This is r...: Movie fans watching "Dark Knight Rises" in a Colorado cinema at first thought gunfire was a special effect. But then people started collap...

Gunman turns movie into surreal horror: 'This is real'


Movie fans watching "Dark Knight Rises" in a Colorado cinema at first thought gunfire was a special effect. But then people started collapsing with injuries.

Watch this video


http://edition.cnn.com/2012/07/20/us/colorado-theater-scene/index.html?hpt=hp_c1

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/07/20/us/gallery/colorado-theater-shooting/index.html


cnn

marilena: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/07/20/reuters-t...

marilena:
http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/07/20/reuters-t...
: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/07/20/reuters-tv-witnesses-how-colorado-gunman-massacred?videoId=236606067&videoChannel=117849 (...

http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/07/20/reuters-tv-witnesses-how-colorado-gunman-massacred?videoId=236606067&videoChannel=117849

Myia Young, 4, places a candle by an American flag during a vigil for victims behind a theater where a gunman open fire at moviegoers in Aurora, Colorado July 20, 2012. REUTERS/ Jeremy Papasso

(Reuters) - A gunman wearing a full suit of tactical body armor, a helmet and a gas mask opened fire at a packed midnight showing of the new "Batman" film in a Denver suburb on Friday, killing 12 people after setting off two smoke bombs in the dark theater.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tdJlZZBoNI&feature=player_embedded

Olympics 2012: Teen arrested over torch grab - videoA teenager tried to grab the Olympic torch as the relay passed through Gravesend in Kent. The youth leapt from the crowd at runner Anna Skora, but was restrained immediately by Metropolitan Police in the torch security team before being arrested

marilena: The man living alone in the woods to escape Wi-Fi ...

marilena: The man living alone in the woods to escape Wi-Fi ...: Phil Inkley has fled civilisation to escape electromagnetic fields, which he believes cause nosebleeds, headaches, convulsions and blackout...

The man living alone in the woods to escape Wi-Fi and mobile phones

Phil Inkley has fled civilisation to escape electromagnetic fields, which he believes cause nosebleeds, headaches, convulsions and blackouts. Laura Page meets him and investigates the condition known as 'electromagnetic hypersensitivity'
Phil Inkley outside his caravan in Hampshire


 It takes me seven phone calls and five attempts on Skype before I manage to hold a conversation with Phil Inkley. When I visit him a week later I see that the wire from his laptop dangles precariously through his caravan window and over a few metres of wet woodland to a dongle concealed in a box in the far corner of the land. Sometimes it works.
After our conversations are repeatedly abandoned because of interference and delays, Phil cycles six miles to the nearest phone box. It is out of order. The next box contains no phone. Phil texts from a mobile phone he seldom dares to use to tell me the situation and adds: "You can see I'm not just physically isolated from people, it's very difficult to speak to them remotely too."
For Phil, it is this isolation which is one of the most difficult aspects of suffering from self-diagnosed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Daily symptoms include nosebleeds, headaches, heart palpitations, lethargy and tinnitus. Electro-hypersensitive people attribute such symptoms to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) such as those emitted by Wi-Fimobile phonesDECT phones and certain light sources, and say symptoms worsen with close proximity.
Phil's illness is totally dominating his life. He now lives in a caravan in the woods in Hampshire in an attempt to distance himself from EMFs. He is constantly worried that he will be asked to move on. When symptoms have been really bad he has retreated further into the forest, at one point living in an abandoned children's den and cooking on an open fire.
"I've been through hellishly desperate times with this," he says. "People don't believe that EMFs are the cause of EHS and it gets you in such a state. You're battling for your existence and people think it's all in your head." He breaks down in tears, not for the last time during our interview. The strain of his situation is taking its toll.
Solitary as Phil's suffering seems, he is not alone. Estimates of the prevalence of EHS in the developed world vary, but most surveys indicate somewhere between 2% and 5%. The best-known sufferer is Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland, the former prime minister of Norway, medical doctor and former director general of the World Health Organisation. She brought EHS into the mainstream when she said she was sensitive to radio waves from mobile phones in 2002. She was accused by some of scaremongering, and there is debate over whether she jumped or was pushed from the WHO. Either way, to the consternation of campaign groups, she has now gone quiet on the subject
Phil Inkley in an abandoned den in Hampshire
Phil says he first experienced symptoms around the time that Wi-Fi came along. He had been working as a sound technician and, being from a "techy" background, regularly fixed computers for family and friends. After a day working around strong Wi-Fi he would feel pressure at his temples and fluttering pains in his chest.
It was when he encountered the very same symptoms tuning in a hands-free phone kit for his dad that he began searching for an explanation. "I looked online at some reports about EHS from independent scientists. I didn't like what I was reading so tried to leave it [EMFs] alone," he says.
While EHS is not very well understood, the probability of any serious health risks from EMFs have been widely rebutted by the WHO, national radiation authorities, the mobile phone industry and the majority of researchers.
There have been a number of studies testing the role of EMFs in causing EHS. Sufferers were exposed to EMFs similar to those that they attributed to the cause of their symptoms under single- or double-blind conditions. Most of these studies indicated that EHS individuals could not detect EMF exposure any more accurately than non-EHS individuals. A 2005 review of 31 of the experiments stated that EHS is unrelated to the presence of EMFs, but said that more research was required.
Some researchers have postulated that one possibility for the results is that subjects expected a negative effect and so experienced one, and that this can be expanded to explain why EHS sufferers feel symptoms when near to EMFs more generally. Another theory is that there are some other physical causes such as flickering lights or problems with visual display units (VDUs).
However, the methodology and analysis of the studies have been questioned by EHS sufferers, campaigners and some scientists. There have been claims that the studies were influenced by the huge political and financial implications of a link being found, a view backed by Prof Andrew Marino at Louisiana State University, whose own research does suggest links between mobile phone radiation and illness. He criticised the studies, saying they were sponsored by the communications companies Telenor and NetCom. Researchers have denied they were influenced in any way.
Phil is in firm agreement with those who believe that politics are at play. When I express doubt over the conspiracy theories, he reminds me that the tobacco industry managed to cover up the dangers of smoking for 40 years with apparent backing from the establishment.
He also compares current feelings about EHS to those about ME and Gulf war syndrome in the past - illnesses that were said not to really exist or be purely psychological and that, while still not fully understood, are now taken much more seriously.
Phil Inkley
I ask him if he has considered that his symptoms could have a psychological cause.
"I wanted to believe I was going mad. It would have been easier," he says. "But I knew I wasn't. I hoped for a while that the gas boiler was leaking carbon monoxide and giving me headaches and that I was imagining the rest. But it wasn't."
After Phil's illness started to worsen to include convulsions and blackouts he began to ask for help, but does not feel he has received any.
"I was getting really scared about what was happening to me but I thought, 'This is England. I'll just get in touch with the authorities and explain and they'll sort it out.' That's how naive I was."
Phil's GP simply informed him that there was no convincing evidence that electromagnetic radiation has any detrimental health effects. He then contacted the Health Protection Agency, leaving several messages, but no one ever got back to him - until he received a voicemail telling him not to call again.
In 2005 the HPA reported that considering only whether electromagnetic radiation was a causative factor was not meeting the needs of sufferers, although continued research in this area was essential. Whatever the cause, EHS symptoms are real and they can be severe and extremely disabling. Sufferers are not getting the support they need.
Phil describes his condition as "living in a nuclear war". He asks: "Can you imagine what it's like when your environment becomes so aggressive to your health?" His voice trembles and he looks desperate.
Phil could certainly do with moral support and financial help to stop him slipping further towards the edge of society. But what he really wants is for people to believe he is right about the causes of EHS. He'd like more independent studies to be undertaken and seriously considered.
It is not clear whether more studies will be conducted in the near future. It's even less clear that they will ever yield the results he is looking for.


guardian

marilena: Gender-neutral? Harrods' new Toy Kingdom tries to ...

marilena: Gender-neutral? Harrods' new Toy Kingdom tries to ...: Phoebe McFadden picked up her absolute favourite toy of the moment, a sexy, spiky-fanged vampire figurine wearing a punky fuchsia mini...

Gender-neutral? Harrods' new Toy Kingdom tries to end boy-girl divide London department store organises new multi-sensory toy zone by theme rather than sex

Phoebe McFadden in the new toy department at Harrods, London.


Phoebe McFadden picked up her absolute favourite toy of the moment, a sexy, spiky-fanged vampire figurine wearing a punky fuchsia miniskirt and knee-high boots. "My favourite is Draculaura," she explained, pulling on the doll's raven locks. "We have a lot in common – we both really like pink."
Dazzled by the array of toys on offer in the new 26,000 square footHarrods Toy Kingdom, which quietly opened its doors this week in time for a grand launch on Sunday, the eight-year-old appeared blissfully unaware of the store's "ground-breaking" move to make it less gender-specific.
But, following in the footsteps of Hamleys, which removed "boy" and "girl" signposts from its shop last December, the London department store has deliberately organised its new multi-sensory toy zone by theme rather than sex. "We felt it was a bit of a risk, when that formula traditionally works, to turn around and break the mould," said David Miller, director of Harrods Home, who said the store was aiming to create "retail theatre" and attract the customers of the future.
If Harrods hopes to loosen the gender-specific tyranny of toys, it has a battle on its hands. While the Lego and Hornby train-filled Wonderland was crammed with small boys intent on destruction on the Guardian's visit this week, the Enchanted Forest, with fairy voices emanating from multicoloured flowers and hundreds of dolls, was the main draw for girls.
Some aspects of the six-zone Toy Kingdom have left feminists marking their store card "could try harder". While space in the department may be free of explicit labels, the ebullient and youthful staff are clearly demarcated: female workers wear natty pink T-shirts with the slogan Team Toy on their backs, while men, inevitably, are in blue. A decision made entirely because they were nice colours, according to Miller.
"We are not stopping our female members of staff wearing a boy T-shirt, should they want to," he said, adding: "Although they are a different cut." So there were no gender connotations whatsoever in the choice? "No, none at all."
It is a hopeless own goal, according to Emma Moore, founder of Pink Stinks, which campaigns against gender-targeted products and marketing. "It's pathetic and lazy and just shows how entrenched these ridiculous stereotypes are," she said.
But she applauded the company's move to organise toys around theme rather than gender. "It's a small step, but it's a step in the right direction. But if retailers do not do this they are missing a trick. There is a growing movement of mums and dads who want toys designed for children – not girls and boys."
Lead designer of the project, Matt Smith, of Shed Design, who created the multimillion pound overhaul, said the "amazing dreamscapes" which lead children on a journey through the toy department were designed to appeal to both boys and girls. "They are deliberately non-gender-specific, because we felt that was an antiquated way of looking at toys," he said. "I think increasingly kids are playing with an array of different toys and we wanted to give that balance."
Use of lighting and atmospheric music mark the transition from one area to the next. The oompah soundtrack of the Big Top leads to the twinkling fairy noises, dappled light and birdsong of the Enchanted Forest before the hooting of trains and zip of Scalextric cars in Wonderland and sci-fibleeps of the Odyssey gadget zone make way for swashbuckling pirate cries or the whoosh of magic wands in the Reading Room.
"It is a shame when toy departments just become a place to sell a retail product," he said. "We didn't want to lose that magic, which is why we wanted it to be so much more than a toy shop."
There are a dizzying number of toys on offer, from the return of Cabbage Patch kids, to puzzles, dressing-up kits, computer games and magic tricks. This being Harrods, there is a petrol-powered child Mercedes SLK is on sale for a cool £6,995 while a towering doll's house costs £8,995.
But while the store has made a positive move by grouping toys by product, it is the toys on offer that really matter, according to Dr Laura Nelson, who led the campaign against Hamleys and has set up a gender stereotypes project in schools to tackle the issue. "Gender stereotyping of toys restricts the choices of children and their parents; it influences the activities children engage in, their interests and skills and ultimately the roles they take in society," she said. "Until all toys and the shop layouts are completely gender-neutral, there will always be pressure on girls and boys to pursue the route in life consistent with their stereotype."
Jackson Castleberry, a 10-year-old on holiday from Texas, appeared to have taken a leap across the gender divide, saying he had nothing against the mixing of the toys and wouldn't mind going into the dressing-up section. "It doesn't mean you have to buy it, right?" he said.

Review by Phoebe McFadden, 8½

With a boggle-eyed toy chihuahua wedged firmly under her arm, Phoebe McFadden and her mother Clodagh, took the Guardian on a tour of the new Toy Kingdom. "It's totally awesome, I really really love it," was the initial judgment from the sharp-eyed reviewer. While the Odyssey room was thought "cool", it was also a little "boysy" for Phoebe, who loved the stuffed toys and dolls on offer the best.
At her most energised in front of the Monster High figurines, she was also a big fan of the book department, with its imagination-inducing soundscapes and nooks for reading. "I like the noises. They make you think about the stories in the books," she said. Cabbage Patch kids, back on the scene after a spell in the cold, were a bit "weird", while Madame Alexander dolls – with their detachable wigs and outfits – were decidedly great.
Phoebe thought it was nice that all the toys were mixed in because it gave children plenty to look at,
but the toy that really grabbed her was the giant doll's house, at nearly £9,000. Even after saving up all her pocket money, it was going to be a struggle. Looking around at the thousands of toys, she said: "It's just so difficult to decide what to buy."
guardian

Πέμπτη, 19 Ιουλίου 2012

marilena: Battle of the sexes continues at Olympics By BELIN...

marilena: Battle of the sexes continues at Olympics By BELIN...: June 30, 2012: Competitors practice during a men's synchronized swimming competition at the EuroGames 2012 in Budapest. More than 3,0...

Battle of the sexes continues at Olympics By BELINDA GOLDSMITH, REUTERS




June 30, 2012: Competitors practice during a men's synchronized swimming competition at the EuroGames 2012 in Budapest. More than 3,000 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender athletes will compete in the EuroGames 2012.
Reuters

Competitors practice during a men's synchronized swimming competition at the EuroGames 2012 in Budapest

Competitors practice during a men's synchronized swimming competition at the EuroGames 2012 in Budapest

Battle of the sexes continues at Olympics

By BELINDA GOLDSMITH, REUTERS

LONDON - Women boxers have claimed an early victory at the 2012 Olympics by knocking out the last all-male sport but the battle for sex equality at the Games rages on, and not just among women -- male synchronized swimmers are also demanding equal rights.
London marks the first Olympics where women will compete in all 26 sports on offer, a major change from Stockholm 100 years ago when women could only participate in five of 110 events.
Campaigners for gender equality acknowledge there has been progress but stress the battle is far from over and the Games must symbolize, reflect and celebrate the dominant beliefs and values of society.
At the London Olympics, running from July 27 until Aug. 12, women are competing in 30 fewer events than men.
A total of 162 gold medals are up for grabs for male competitors while women can win only 132. At the 2008 Beijing Games there were 165 gold medals for men and 127 for women.
Annie Sugier, spokeswoman for the French coordination for the European Women's Lobby, said several women's groups were planning to hold a demonstration in London on July 25 to put seven demands to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) regarding discrimination and segregation.
"The objective of the Olympics is to build a better world through sport but the reality is that we still have all the stereotypes, discrimination, and prostitution around the Games," Sugier told Reuters.
"The Olympics is the right place to enforce change as there is just one law for all. You have the instruments to enforce equality and equality is justice."
Tackling sex inequality and other forms of discrimination at the Olympics is viewed as critical by campaigners. The Games are a high-profile global event where the same rules apply to all nations and these values can filter into other areas of life.
It is also unique for a sporting event as the audience is fairly evenly split between men and women and therefore a platform for women's sport to be on a par with men's events, to establish women as role models, and to encourage women to take up sport which can be a way to empower and build confidence.
Sugier, who has been campaigning for equality and neutrality at the Olympics for 20 years, said the IOC needed to act more decisively after stating its support for gender equality at the Olympics but so far failing to meet its targets.
In 1996 the IOC set a target to ensure women held 20% of the positions in its ruling bodies by 2005 which included the 205 National Olympic Committees and the 35 Olympic International Olympic Sports Federations.
This has not been met, and Sugier says women on average only hold about 10% of these positions. Some of the National Olympic Committees have no women.
The board of the London Organizing Committee, LOCOG, has only one woman among its 19 members, former Olympian Princess Anne, while the IOC has 20 women among its 105 members which falls just short of the 20%.
"With so few women serving in leadership positions and a lack of commitment among the male-dominated leadership, there has been little progress on supporting women as athletes and leaders," said sports historian Dr Maureen Smith from California State University in a report for the U.S.-based Women's Sports Foundation, founded by Billie Jean King in 1974.
She said this lack of commitment started at grassroots and was typical of developmental levels all the way to the upper echelons of competitive Olympic and Paralympic sport.
The gender gap has narrowed. At Beijing there was 4,746 women competitors which was a record 42% of the total.
But this was despite IOC President Jacques Rogge in 2004 stating that: "our ultimate goal must be 50-50 participation." He did not, however, set a clear date for this proportion.
"No time deadline has been set but we would hope that London will see the highest percentage of female participation in history," said IOC spokeswoman Emmanuelle Moreau.
Smith said certain sports were getting better when it came to gender balance and for some countries this was not an issue at all.
"Some countries don't care if it is a man or a woman winning. They just care about winning the medal. But there is still some way to go," Smith told Reuters.
At the Beijing Olympics, three countries did not bring women athletes but this has changed for London as the Muslim nations of Qatar and Brunei will include women competitors in their teams for the first time.
The final country to forbid women to compete, Saudi Arabia, last month bowed to pressure from the IOC and said it would allow women who qualify to compete at the London Games.
It has yet to name any female athletes who will represent the Middle Eastern kingdom.
Sports historians said the changes at the Olympics reflected the overall changes in society since the start of the modern Olympics in Athens 1896 when no women were allowed to compete.
Women first appeared at the Olympics in Paris in 1900, competing in golf and tennis, but were excluded from track and field competitions until 1928 when the longest race was the 800 metres.
Several women collapsed in exhaustion during the race and then IOC President, Count Henri Baillet-Latour, even suggested ruling out all women competitors from the Games.
Clearly this did not happen but the women's 800 metres did not reappear until 1960. Women were not allowed to run the marathon until 1984.
Tim Woodhouse, head of policy at the Women's Sports and Fitness Foundation, said a number of sports were seen to put women's health and their fertility at risk.
"Amazingly it was not until the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s that these myths were debunked," said Woodhouse, whose foundation is a UK charity that aims to make women active and confident.
In the United States, the 1972 legislation Title IX, which prohibited gender discrimination in educational programs, had a massive impact on women participating in sports at colleges and high schools.
As well as the debut of women boxers in London, the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, will see women being allowed for the first time to compete in ski jumping. The Nordic combined events at Sochi, however, will only be contested by men.
"The addition of these sports, including boxing at London, is a really positive step forward but there is still a big disparity in other sports," said Woodhouse.
The IOC should consider including some sports which were more women based, such as netball, if it really wanted to resolve the issue, he added, and there was still major discrepancies in numbers in canoeing, rowing, wrestling, weight lifting and judo.
"These numbers need to be worked on and it takes leadership from the IOC to push that agenda," he said.
But it is not just women who want equality.
Men have called for action after being ruled out from competing at two events at the Summer Olympics, synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics, even though there are growing numbers of men participating in both sports.
A lobby group of male synchronized swimmers wrote to the IOC and swimming's governing body FINA in June to argue that men should no longer be excluded from this event at the Olympics.
The group, which includes the London swimming group Out To Swim, said this was gender discrimination despite the Olympic Charter condemning any discrimination regarding race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise.
"For the most part, this discrimination has affected women athletes, and great progress has been made in this area. But in at least one sport, it is men who are victims of this discrimination, which is no less intolerable than that aimed at women," said the letter.
Stephen Adshead, manager of the Out to Swim Angels synchronized swimming team that was set up three years ago, said this was "blatant inequality and unfair."
"We realize it is too late for men synchronized swimmers at London but we would like to have a serious discussion with the IOC after the Games as there is no reason why there can't be gender equality in all sports," Adshead told Reuters. 



marilena: NELSON MANDELA 94TH BIRTHDAY

marilena: NELSON MANDELA 94TH BIRTHDAY: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2012/jul/18/nelson-mandela-birthday-south-africa-video Nelson Mandela's 94th birthday celebrated...

NELSON MANDELA 94TH BIRTHDAY


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2012/jul/18/nelson-mandela-birthday-south-africa-video

Nelson Mandela's 94th birthday celebrated in South Africa - video

In Durban during a pre-season tour, the Manchester United manager, Sir Alex Ferguson, joins South Africans celebrating former president Nelson Mandela's 94th birthday. Schoolchildren in Mandela's hometown, Qunu, sing Happy Birthday while in Johannesburg hundreds gather in Mandela Square to celebrate

GUARDIAN

marilena: British weather posing Olympics challenge, admits ...

marilena: British weather posing Olympics challenge, admits ...: London has spent seven years planning to hold the Games and a spokesman from the London Organizing Committee of the ...

British weather posing Olympics challenge, admits Coe By the CNN Wire Staff July 18, 2012 -- Updated 0700 GMT (1500 HKT)

The UK has spent seven years preparing for the Olympics, with billions spent on new stadiums, transport upgrades and security measures, but organizers are powerless to prevent the weather disrupting the festivities.

The Olympic torch has been on a tour of the UK since May 19 and while there have been many days filled with sunshine, others, like this one near Mansfield, have proved a threat to the flame itself.

Many regions were officially in drought conditions during the spring, but the summer has seen flash floods up and down the country as the jet stream continues to direct stormy weather across the UK -- and meteorologists predict this will continue.

Thousands of people flocked into London to see the flotilla, withstanding driving rain for most of the procession.

As is usually the case, rain forced Wimbledon organizers to tinker with the tournament schedule as play was interrupted numerous times on all but Centre Court, which has a retractable roof.

Cricket, a quintessentially British summer sport, is also at the mercy of the weather. England's series with the West Indies and Australia were both affected.

Formula One's British Grand Prix eventually began under clear skies but heavy rain prior to the race forced organizers to ask those with cars not to attend Saturday's qualifying session after camping areas and car parks became waterlogged.


London has spent seven years planning to hold the Games and a spokesman from the London Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) told CNN last week that every eventuality had been accounted for.

Δευτέρα, 16 Ιουλίου 2012

marilena: Dilemma for Greek youth: Fight or flee By Irene Ch...

marilena: Dilemma for Greek youth: Fight or flee By Irene Ch...: Maria Papanagiotaki and Aristotle Skalizos, part of Greece's young professional class. They have been dating for more than two years bu...

Dilemma for Greek youth: Fight or flee By Irene Chapple, CNN


Maria Papanagiotaki and Aristotle Skalizos, part of Greece's young professional class. They have been dating for more than two years but have different views on whether to stay in Greece or leave for opportunities elsewhere.
Maria Papanagiotaki and Aristotle Skalizos, part of Greece's young professional class. They have been dating for more than two years but have different views on whether to stay in Greece or leave for opportunities elsewhere.



Marios- Aristotle Koulouris and Nick Skalizos both want to leave Greece and study abroad. But they also feel the pull of family and loyalty to their country, and want to help bring their homeland out of its crisis.
Marios- Aristotle Koulouris and Nick Skalizos both want to leave Greece and study abroad. But they also feel the pull of family and loyalty to their country, and want to help bring their homeland out of its crisis.


Christina Psarra, who works in policy at humanitarian organization Doctors of the World, studied at the London School of Economics but returned to Greece, she says, to feed her heart rather than mind.
Christina Psarra, who works in policy at humanitarian organization Doctors of the World, studied at the London School of Economics but returned to Greece, she says, to feed her heart rather than mind.


George Stathopoulos, an investment banker, studied in London but returned to Greece, which he believes has the potential to use the crisis as an opportunity to create a vibrant European economy.
George Stathopoulos, an investment banker, studied in London but returned to Greece, which he believes has the potential to use the crisis as an opportunity to create a vibrant European economy.

cnn