Παρασκευή, 19 Οκτωβρίου 2012

marilena: Greece Nears Aid Revival as Samaras Wins EU Summit...

marilena: Greece Nears Aid Revival as Samaras Wins EU Summit...: Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras moved closer to winning a delayed aid disbursement when European leaders praised his government’s bu...

Greece Nears Aid Revival as Samaras Wins EU Summit Praise By Jonathan Stearns - Oct 19, 2012


Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras moved closer to winning a delayed aid disbursement when European leaders praised his government’s budget-cutting push.
At his first European Union summit since becoming premier in June, Samaras said record unemployment showed the price Greece was paying for austerity demanded by the euro area as a condition for emergency loans. He urged parallel steps to kick- start the economy and stuck to a request for two extra years until 2016 to meet targets for narrowing the budget deficit, prompting signs of European goodwill.
Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras
“We welcome the determination of the Greek government to deliver on its commitments and we commend the remarkable efforts by the Greek people,” the 16 other euro-area leaders said in a statement released about 3 a.m. today in Brussels after the first session of the EU meeting. “Good progress has been made to bring the adjustment program back on track.”
The Samaras government has been negotiating with the euro area and the International Monetary Fund over 13.5 billion euros ($17.6 billion) of austerity measures for 2013 and 2014 needed to qualify for the release of more loan instalments. Transfers have been frozen since June.
The next aid payout is scheduled to total 31 billion euros, most of which would be to recapitalize banks. That disbursement would be under a 130 billion-euro rescue package approved earlier this year after an initial 110 billion-euro bailout in 2010.

Greek Recession

Creditors that also include the IMF are loosening the budget noose on Greece as its recession heads for a sixth year in 2013, domestic anti-bailout parties gain in popularity and the jobless rate reaches 25 percent. At stake is whether Samaras’s shaky three-party coalition can pay its bills, recapitalize domestic banks and stay in the 17-nation euro.
The softening in attitude was symbolized earlier this month when Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, the biggest European backer of the total 240 billion euros in rescue pledges for Greece since 2010, made her first visit to Athens sinceEurope’s debt crisis erupted three years ago. She held a meeting with Samaras today in Brussels as the second part of the EU summit got under way.

‘Big Progress’

“One has to recognize that a lot has already been done and that they’re pressing ahead” in Greece, Merkel told reporters afterward. She said she works “very well” with Samaras, who, at his own press conference, said “the climate has changed. All our European partners have recognized that we have made big progress lately. The Greek economy and society are on the brink.”
After an inconclusive election in May, Greece held a re-run the following month in which Samaras’s New Democracy party remained the biggest in the Greek parliament while still lacking a majority.
Samaras formed a government with the Socialist Pasok, which came in third, and the sixth-place Democratic Left. The ruling coalition is an unprecedented attempt at political unity in Greece after an anti-bailout party called Syriza overturned four decades of dominance by New Democracy and Pasok with second- place finishes in the May and June elections.
Greece narrowed its budget deficit from more than 15 percent of gross domestic product in 2009 -- five times the EU limit -- to 9.1 percent in 2011. The spending gap is due to shrink to about 7 percent of GDP this year.

Policy Reforms

“We expect Greece to continue budgetary and structural policy reforms and we encourage its efforts to ensure swift implementation of the program,” the euro-area leaders said. “These conditions will allow Greece to achieve renewed growth and will ensure its future in the euro area.”
French President Francois Hollande said the next aid tranche for Greece must be paid in “the coming weeks” once the euro area and IMF complete their current review of the nation’s finances.
Samaras said his request for a two-year extension to meet fiscal-austerity targets is tied to the questions of a 12 billion-euro funding gap that would result from the longer timetable and of the sustainability of Greece’s debt, which is supposed to fall to 120 percent of GDP in 2020. He said these issues would likely be decided after the creditors’ review.
EU Economic and Monetary Affairs Commissioner Olli Rehn said he expected Greece to win the green light for the next disbursement within a month.

‘Positive Conclusion’

“I’m confident that we will be able to come to a positive conclusion of this review,” Rehn told Bloomberg Television in Brussels yesterday. “I expect that this will happen in the early part of November, before mid-November.”
Luxembourg Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker signaled the onus is on euro-area governments to unblock the aid for Greece.
“I am very happy with the performance the Greek government has undertaken,” Juncker, who also heads the group of euro-area finance ministers, told reporters as he emerged from the first EU summit session. “Now it’s up to the other 16, after Greece will have delivered, to deliver.”
To contact the reporter on this story: Jonathan Stearns in Brussels at jstearns2@bloomberg.net
To contact the editor responsible for this story: James Hertling at jhertling@bloomberg.net

marilena: Are Greek police 'colluding' with far-right Golden...

marilena: Are Greek police 'colluding' with far-right Golden...: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-19983575 bbc

Are Greek police 'colluding' with far-right Golden Dawn?

marilena: Brazil with Michael Palin

marilena: Brazil with Michael Palin: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-19989037 Michael Palin has travelled the world for the past 25 years, earning him a reputation as t...

Brazil with Michael Palin

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-19989037

Michael Palin has travelled the world for the past 25 years, earning him a reputation as the man who's been everywhere. But there's one big gap in his passport - Brazil.
bbc


Πέμπτη, 18 Οκτωβρίου 2012

marilena: James Mylne: Creating art with biros

marilena: James Mylne: Creating art with biros: http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-19961273 London artist James Mylne has been creating photorealistic artwork using Bic biros fo...

James Mylne: Creating art with biros

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-19961273

London artist James Mylne has been creating photorealistic artwork using Bic biros for 15 years.

bbc


marilena: DRILLING OUT OF DEBT: COULD OIL AND GAS RESERVES S...

marilena: DRILLING OUT OF DEBT: COULD OIL AND GAS RESERVES S...: By Alain Salles LE MONDE /Worldcrunch ATHENS  - Everyone knows that  Greece’s debt  is spiraling  out of control , but few know that t...

DRILLING OUT OF DEBT: COULD OIL AND GAS RESERVES SAVE THE GREEK ECONOMY?

Drilling Out Of Debt: Could Oil And Gas Reserves Save The Greek Economy?


By Alain Salles
LE MONDE/Worldcrunch
ATHENS - Everyone knows that Greece’s debt is spiraling out of control, but few know that the country is an oil producer, though its production is minimal: 2,000 barrels a day – 0.5% of just its own needs.
During the 1980’s, however, Greece produced 30,000 barrels a day – 12% of its consumption – through oil fields off the coast of Kavala, in the northern Aegean Sea.
Oil deposits are nothing new in Greece. Herodotus wrote about them in the 5th century B.C.  “I have seen pitch drawn up out of a lake on the island of Zakynthos (…) They let down a pole into this lake, with a myrtle branch fastened to the end, and pull out the pitch that clings to the myrtle, which has the smell of asphalt.”
Twenty-five centuries later, things are not so simple. In the late 1990’s, there were unsuccessful drilling attempts in western Greece, notably in the Gulf of Patras, where the island of Zakynthos is located. Afterwards, the drilling stopped for almost 15 years. Greece did not try to explore other oil deposits, preferring to borrow money to pay for its oil, further increasing its debt.
In the meantime, Israel and Cyprus were busy discovering gas deposits in the deep waters off their countries. Neighboring Albania was deploying oil rigs.
It was not until it was faced with a tragic crisis that Greece decided to re-launch its own gas and oil exploration in late 2011. Greece has recently started accepting bids to explore the three regions that had already shown potential in the late 1990’s:  Ionnina, the largest city of the Epirus region in northwestern Greece, near the Albanian border; in the Ionian sea, in the Gulf of Patras; and in Katakolo.
There are known offshore oil deposits in Katakolo, but they are small, representing an estimated four million barrels a day. Estimates for Ionnina and the Gulf of Patras are 50 to 100 million barrels.
Needless to say, major oil companies did not rush to bid on these Greek deposits. The two main candidates are Greek: Hellenic Petroleum, tied to Melrose (Italy) and Edison (UK), and Energean Oil & Gas, which is already exploiting the Kavala deposit, in partnership with Schlumberger. British oil company Chariot is bidding in the Epirus region, and the Greek government has already announced that it has selected several other areas across the country which will soon be open to bidding.
Deep below the Mediterranean 
But since Israel and Cyprus discovered oil reserves in the Mediterranean, it is the waters off the southern coast of Crete that are the most sought-after. In September, Norwegian company Petroleum Geo Service was chosen to carry out seismic surveys on 220,000 square kilometers of sea. “These studies will take about 18 months. In 2014, we will know if there’s a chance of finding oil or gas. The government will then be able to open the bids for drilling rights. After that, we’ll have to wait another five to seven years to see results,” says Theodore Tsakiris, in charge of the Geopolitics of Energy program for Eliamep, a think-tank.
Geologist Elias Konofagos believes that the most promising region is located south of Crete, facing Libya. “If there are deposits, most of them are deep underwater. We have compared geological data south of Crete to other, similar areas, like Venezuela or Timor, where gas and oil deposits were discovered.”
Given the similarities with the Levantine Sea, where the Israeli and Cypriot deposits were discovered, Konofagos believes these are mostly gas deposits, which are probably located 1,500 or 2,500 meters deep. “Every year we import between 12 and 14 billion euros worth of gas and oil. That’s the amount Greece’s creditors want the country to save by implementing austerity measures,” he says, regretting that his country has wasted 15 years since the late 1990’s.
The next couple of years will be crucial for exploration. Today it’s nearly impossible to tell whether there are important deposits and if they are exploitable. “In 1999, only two people thought there was gas in Israel and Cyprus, and that’s when they discovered three of the biggest gas deposits,” says Konofagos.
But the CEO of Energean, Mathios Rigas, warns that it can only work if conditions above ground start to change. “If seismic surveys show there is gas and oil in the Mediterranean and that we can also start production in Epirus and in the Ionian Sea, certain things will have to change," he says. "If the international market has the impression it is still dealing with the old Greek way of doing things, with its lack of transparency, no one will be interested.”

worldcrunch

marilena: WELCOME TO THE WORST HOTEL IN THE WORLD: PROUDLY D...

marilena: WELCOME TO THE WORST HOTEL IN THE WORLD: PROUDLY D...: http://www.worldcrunch.com/food-travel/welcome-to-the-worst-hotel-in-the-world-quot-proudly-disappointing-travelers-for-40-years-quot-/amst...

WELCOME TO THE WORST HOTEL IN THE WORLD: PROUDLY DISAPPOINTING TRAVELERS FOR 40 YEARS...

marilena: Armstrong Stands to Lose $30 Million as Sponsors F...

marilena: Armstrong Stands to Lose $30 Million as Sponsors F...: Lance Armstrong during the 199,5 km and 16th stage of the 2010 Tour de France cycling race. Lance Armstrong’s loss of support from  Nike...

Armstrong Stands to Lose $30 Million as Sponsors Flee


Lance Armstrong during the 199,5 km and 16th stage of the 2010 Tour de France cycling race.

Lance Armstrong’s loss of support from Nike Inc. (NKE) and other sponsors because of ties to performance-enhancing drug use will cost him about $30 million in earning potential, according to a sports marketing agent.

“That would include current endorsement deals, future endorsement deals and corporate speaking,” said Steve Rosner, whose clients at 16W Marketing LLC in East Rutherford, New Jersey, include baseball’s Cal Ripken Jr., basketball’s Hakeem Olajuwon and football’s Howie Long, each retired and a member of his sport’s Hall of Fame.
Nike, the world’s largest sporting-goods maker who sponsored Armstrong since 1996, dropped the seven-time Tour de France winner today because of “seemingly insurmountable evidence” that he doped and misled the company for more than a decade, it said in a statement.
Anheuser-Busch InBev NV (ABI) said later in a statement that it won’t renew its contract with the 41-year-old retired cyclist to endorse Michelob Ultra beer when the current deal expires at the end of 2012.

Trek Exits

Trek Bicycle Corp. then also terminated its relationship with Armstrong, while saying in a statement it will continue to back his cancer foundation.
“This ultimately ends the marketing storyline of Lance the brand,” Paul Swangard, managing director of the Warsaw Sports Marketing Center at the University of Oregon, said in a telephone interview. “He just simply won’t be able to rekindle and re-energize his Madison Avenue appeal, and Nike, as the one who stood by him through all of this, making the decision they did is about as much a career-crusher as anything I could ever imagine.”
A U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report last week said Armstrong’s career was “fueled from start to finish by doping.” Armstrong, who had his Tour titles stripped by the Colorado Springs, Colorado-based agency in August, used performance-enhancers and required teammates to use them or face dismissal from his squad, according to a 202-page summary of its case.
Armstrong has repeatedly denied doping, saying he has never failed a drug test. He said today he was stepping down as chairman of Livestrong, the charity he started in 1996, to “spare the foundation any negative effects as a result of controversy surrounding my cycling career.”

Wealthiest Cyclist

Armstrong and Nike signed a five-year contract in 2010 to pay the Lance Armstrong Foundation at least $7.5 million annually from profits generated by Livestrong merchandise, according to Outside magazine. Nike said last week after release of the USADA report that it “plans to continue to support Lance.”
Armstrong made $21 million in 2010, making him the 50th highest-paid athlete in the world and the wealthiest cyclist, according to an annual list released by Forbes magazine.
He also has an endorsement deal with Luxottica Group SpA (LUX)’s Oakley unit, which said in an e-mail that it would await a final decision on Armstrong’s sanctions from the International Cycling Union.
One energy-food company, FRS Co., which is part-owned by Palo Alto, California-based Oak Investment Partners, ended its business relationship with Armstrong, Chief Marketing Officer Matt Kohler said in a telephone interview today.
Honey Stinger, another energy-food company in which Armstrong is a part owner, is “in the process of removing Lance Armstrong’s image and endorsement from our product packaging,” Len Zanni, marketing director of the Steamboat Springs, Colorado-based company, said in an e-mail today.

‘No Obligations’

While RadioShack Corp. (RSH) is listed as a sponsor on Armstrong’s website, it “has no current obligations” with him, Eric Bruner, a spokesman for the company, said in an e-mail.
Nike will change the name of the Lance Armstrong Fitness Center on its corporate campus in Beaverton, Oregon, spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi said in an e-mail. The company also won’t be using him in marketing for its Livestrong line of apparel.
“To many Lance Armstrong was a superhero and now he appears to be a super fraud,” Scott Becher, managing director of Z Sports & Entertainment, a division of Fort Lauderdale, Florida-based Zimmerman Advertising, said in a telephone interview. “No marketer wants to associate with such a high- profile fall from grace.”

Past Cases

Nike ended contracts with quarterback Michael Vick following his conviction for crimes related to dog fighting and with sprinter Marion Jones after a doping confession. It maintained contracts with basketball player Kobe Bryant and golfer Tiger Woods following acknowledgments of adultery.
“You cannot compare Lance Armstrong to other people like Michael Vick and Tiger Woods because they were still active athletes,” Rosner said. “The book has not been written on them and they do have the upside of continuing to be successful on the field, which will give them the platform to become a positive in the public eye.”
Nike said it will continue to support Livestrong initiatives to help people affected by cancer. The charity, known for its yellow Livestrong bracelets, has raised more than $470 million since 1997, according to its website. Armstrong survived testicular cancer that spread to his lungs and brain before his first Tour de France victory.

‘Supporting Lance’

“There’s not a thing in the world that you can say, shy of him killing somebody, that will prevent this cancer survivor supporting Lance,” said Kevin Gallivan, a 47-year-old commercial-lending banker from Rochester, New York, who has had two operations to remove cancer from his tongue. “I wear a Livestrong band on my wrist, and I will until the day I die.”
Gallivan said in a telephone interview that he developed cancer in his mouth despite not being a tobacco user and that he lost both of his parents to the disease. He said he took strength from reading Armstrong’s book, “It’s Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life,” and that his anger over finding out Armstrong was untruthful isn’t enough to end his support.
“He can be a liar, and he is, but it’s not going to affect my life in any way other than cancer,” Gallivan said.
Armstrong’s resignation is likely to have a small effect on Livestrong, which has diversified its sources of income, partnerships and programs, said Leslie Lenkowsky, a clinical professor of public affairs and philanthropic studies at Indiana University.
“Livestrong has institutionalized itself so that it will be protected from Mr. Armstrong’s problems,” Lenkowsky said in a telephone interview. “The fact that he resigned -- or perhaps he was allowed to resign -- reflects the confidence the organization has in its ability to continue on without him.”
The support Armstrong received from many people also was a result of the marketing efforts of Nike, which had to act because his athletic achievements were directly tied to athletic transgressions, Swangard said.
“It speaks to how powerful a company like Nike, when they invest money behind an athlete, can make him or her appear iconic to the extent that they’re Teflon coated,” Swangard said.
To contact the reporters on this story: Mason Levinson in New York atmlevinson@bloomberg.net; Eben Novy-Williams in New York at enovywilliam@bloomberg.net
bloomberg

marilena: The Market's Hottest Artists By Ben Steverman - Oc...

marilena: The Market's Hottest Artists By Ben Steverman - Oc...:   The Value of Art Art can be profound, beautiful and a great place for the wealthy to park their cash, especially when other invest...

The Market's Hottest Artists By Ben Steverman - Oct 16, 2012


 The Value of Art

The Value of Art

Art can be profound, beautiful and a great place for the wealthy to park their cash, especially when other investing options are uninspiring. A recent Barclays Wealth survey foundmillionaires devoting almost a tenth of their fortunes to nonfinancial assets such as art and collectibles, with more and more owning fine art. New millionaires and billionaires from China, India and Russia are bidding up the value of their countries' master artists at eye-popping rates.
Bloomberg.com worked with Artnet, the online art database, to identify the most lucrative artists of the 21st century so far. Click ahead for the 15 artists -- living and dead, out of about 1,000 tracked by Artnet -- who saw their works' value rise the fastest in percentage terms since 2000.
15. Zao Wou-Ki

15. Zao Wou-Ki

Change since 2000: +1,779%
Zao Wou-Ki's paintings are an "exemplary reconciliation of Chinese and European aesthetics," according to New York University Professor Jonathan Hay. Zao, born in Beijing in 1921, has worked in Paris since 1948.
Top sale price: $8.86 million for "10.1.68" (left) in October 2011.
14. Richard Prince

14. Richard Prince

Change since 2000: +1,912%
A painter and photographer in upstate New York, Richard Prince practices "Appropriation Art," reusing others' images in his work. In fact, Prince, 63, is appealing a federal court finding that he infringed on another photographer's work for a series of collages called "Canal Zone."
Top sale price: $8.45 million for "Overseas Nurse" (left) in July 2008.
13. Albert Oehlen

13. Albert Oehlen

Change since 2000: +1,962%
According to the Saatchi Gallery, which sells his work: "Albert Oehlen's paintings are neither beautiful nor seductive. Their self-consciously brutal surfaces seem to be corrupted from within, a perversion of the paintings they might have been." Born in Germany in 1954, he lives in Cologne and in La Palma, Spain.
Top sale price: $722,500 for "Untitled" in May 2012. At left is "Peon," sold for $422,500 in Oct. 2011.
12. Yayoi Kusama

12. Yayoi Kusama

Change since 2000: +2,306%
Yayoi Kusama has painted since age 10 and worked in almost every other medium, including film, fiction, sculpture and performance art. Born in Japan, she lived in the United States from 1957 to 1973 before returning to her home country. According to Artnet, she is the world's best-selling living female artist.
Top sale price: $5.79 million for "No. 2" (left) in November 2008.
11. Carlos Cruz-Diez

11. Carlos Cruz-Diez

Change since 2000: +2,341%
The art of Carlos Cruz-Diez, 89, explores the way color and light work, using painting and artistic installations. He was born in Venezuela and lives in Paris.
Top sale price: $722,500 for "Physichromie 164" (left) in May 2012.
10. Christopher Wool

10. Christopher Wool

Change since 2000: +2,482%
Christopher Wool is a painter best known for what the New York Times calls "big, sign-like word pictures that deliver gnomic, vaguely alarming messages." Born in Chicago in 1955, he lives in New York.
Top sale price: $7.71 million for "Untitled" (left) in Feb. 2012.
9. Sayed Haider Raza

9. Sayed Haider Raza

Change since 2000: +2,627%
A painter born in 1922, Sayed Haider Raza co-founded the Bombay Progressive Artists' Group, an Indian avant-garde art movement, in 1947. Although he moved to Paris, his work was strongly influenced by his home country, especially since the 1970s. The sale of "Saurashtra" for $3.45 million in 2010 was the highest price ever paid for a work by a living Indian artist, according to Artnet.
Top sale price: $3.45 million for "Saurashtra" (left) in June 2010.
8. Lucian Freud

8. Lucian Freud

Change since 2000: +2,723%
Lucian Freud is a British painter known for his portraits, especially of nudes. When he died in 2011 at age 88, Bloomberg's Laurence Arnoldcalled him a "painter of regular people in all their fleshy glory who stayed loyal to portraiture and realism even when modern art veered toward the abstract." Born in Germany, he was the grandson of Sigmund Freud.
Top sale price: $33.6 million for "Benefits Supervisor Sleeping" (left) in May 2008.
7. Chu Teh-Chun

7. Chu Teh-Chun

Change since 2000: +3,198%
The paintings of Chu Teh-Chun, who was born in China in 1922, moved from traditional Chinese painting toward a more abstract style after he moved to Paris in 1955. He began incorporating Chinese calligraphy into his works in the 1980s.
Top sale price: $5.87 million for "Vertige Neigeux (diptych)" (left) in November 2009.
6. Julian Stanczak

6. Julian Stanczak

Change since 2000: +3,331%
A painter and printmaker born in Poland in 1928, Julian Stanczak lost the use of his right arm during World War II in a Siberian concentration camp. After he emigrated to the United States in 1950, his early work prompted critics to coin the term "Op Art" for works that use optical illusions.
Top sale price: $62,500 for "Linear Transit" (left) in March 2012.
5. Natalia Sergeevna Goncharova

5. Natalia Sergeevna Goncharova

Change since 2000: +4,482%
Natalia Goncharova was a Russian avant-garde painter who also designed costumes and sets for the Ballets Russes in the early 20th century. Her works have been popular among Russian and Ukrainian collectors, according toBloomberg News. Goncharova died in 1962 at the age of 81.
Top sale price: $10.9 million for "Les Fleurs" (left) in June 2008.
4. Lee Bontecou

4. Lee Bontecou

Change since 2000: +4,526%
An American sculptor and printmaker, Lee Bontecou became known in the late 1950s and early 1960s for her three-dimensional reliefs. She taught at Brooklyn College for 21 years and now lives in Pennsylvania.
Top sale price: $1.87 million for "Untitled" (left) in May 2010.
3. Cady Noland

3. Cady Noland

Change since 2000: +5,488%
Cady Noland's works have relied on collage and sculpture to explore themes such as fame and violence in America. Born in 1956, she was called by Vice Magazine in 2003 "one of the most brilliant, highly influential and endlessly ripped-off sculptors of the 80s/90s."
Top sale price: $6.6 million for "Oozewald" (left) in Nov. 2011.
2. Qi Baishi

2. Qi Baishi

Change since 2000: +5,534%
Qi Baishi is considered 20th century China's most popular painter. Born a peasant in 1864, he painted in a traditional Chinese style -- often images of small animals such as mice or shrimp -- despite having no formal training. He died in 1957. This month a series of Qi Baishi paintings were the top lot in a five-day, $263-million auction in Hong Kong dominated by Chinese mainland buyers.
Top sale price: $65.5 million for "Eagle Standing on Pine Tree" (left) in May 2011.
1. Sanyu

1. Sanyu

Change since 2000: +11,782%
Born Chang Yu in 1901 in China, Sanyu was one of the first Chinese artists to study in Paris when he moved there in 1921. Often called the "Chinese Matisse" for his colorful, modernist paintings, he died in Paris in 1966.
Top sale price: $16.5 million for "Five Nudes" (left) in May 2011.


bloomberg

marilena: Και μια πολύ σοβαρή είδηση.... που θα αλλάξει τη ζ...

marilena: Και μια πολύ σοβαρή είδηση.... που θα αλλάξει τη ζ...: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-19986178 BBC

Και μια πολύ σοβαρή είδηση.... που θα αλλάξει τη ζωή μας.....

Τετάρτη, 17 Οκτωβρίου 2012

marilena: Obama comes on strong, Romney stands ground in sec...

marilena: Obama comes on strong, Romney stands ground in sec...: CNN's Candy Crowley, who moderated the debate between U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney, says both were "incredibly ...

Obama comes on strong, Romney stands ground in second debate



CNN's Candy Crowley, who moderated the debate between U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney, says both were "incredibly intense" and "came to play."



Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and U.S. President Barack Obama shake hands following the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on Tuesday, October 16, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/03/politics/gallery/first-presidential-debate/index.html'>See the best photos of the first presidential debate.</a>

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama embrace after the debate.

President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Romney point the finger at each other.

President Obama and Romney clash during the debate.

Romney and President Obama interrupt each other during the debate.

President Barack Obama fought back and Republican challenger Mitt Romney mostly stood his ground.
The second of three presidential debates on Tuesday night brought the desired energy from the president sought by worried Democrats after a lackluster performance in the first encounter nearly two weeks ago.
A forceful Obama defended his policies and challenged Romney on shifting positions on key issues while arguing his Republican rival's proposals would favor the wealthy if elected in three weeks.
Romney repeatedly attacked Obama's record, saying millions of unemployed people and a sluggish economic recovery showed the president's policies had failed.
"Most improved -- that award goes to Barack Obama," said CNN Senior Political Analyst David Gergen. "I think he had a much stronger debate tonight."
Romney also performed well for a second straight debate, Gergen said, adding that Obama got the edge on Tuesday night.
A snap CNN/ORC International poll showed 46% of respondents thought Obama won, compared to 39% for Romney. The result was within the survey's margin of error.
Both candidates walked the floor with microphones in hand at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, raising their voices at times and repeatedly challenging each other's points during the 90-plus minute debate that featured a town hall-style format.
Moderator Candy Crowley, the CNN chief political correspondent, tried in vain at times to prevent each candidate from going over allotted time, with Obama speaking for more than three minutes longer than Romney on the night.
Obama was on the attack from the start, but waited until his final answer -- with no chance for Romney to respond -- to raise his opponent's controversial "47%" comments at a fundraiser in May.
In remarks made public by a secretly recorded video of the event, Romney described 47% of the country as people dependent on government aid who refused to take personal responsibility.
"Think about who he was talking about," Obama said, listing people on Social Security "who've worked all their lives," veterans "who've sacrificed for this country," students, soldiers and "people working hard every day."
The president said he wanted to fight for those people "because if they succeed, I believe the country succeeds."

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Obama go head to head.

Romney gestures to make a point as President Obama looks on.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney square off.

U.S. President Barack Obama listens to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

President Obama promotes his policies as Mitt Romney listens.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney addresses a question as President Obama listens.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney greet the audience.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and U.S. President Barack Obama greet each other on stage.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney shake hands.6.

CNN

marilena: Can the world keep its promises on schools?

marilena: Can the world keep its promises on schools?: The millennium pledge made by international leaders that all children would have a primary education by 2015 is going to be "missed by a ...

Can the world keep its promises on schools?

School girl in Africa

The millennium pledge made by international leaders that all children would have a primary education by 2015 is going to be "missed by a large margin".

Rural school pupils in Tanzania


Chris Stowers/Panos
That's the stark conclusion of a report published by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco).
Despite an initial surge that saw tens of millions of extra children enrolling in primary schools, the report says progress is now "grinding to a halt".
The report, published in Paris on Tuesday, shows the number of children without this basic level of education has fallen from 108 million to 61 million in the first decade of this century.
It means that since 2000, the percentage of the world's children entering primary education has risen from 80% to 90%.
It's a leap forward, but some distance from reaching the finishing line.
"It is simply unacceptable that out-of-school numbers have stagnated, and in Africa have risen," said Gordon Brown, former UK prime minister and now UN global education envoy.
But he added: "Now is not the time for defeatism and despair," and called on the international community to "redouble our efforts".

bbc

marilena: Oct. 16 - President Barack Obama is under pressure...

marilena: Oct. 16 - President Barack Obama is under pressure...: http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/10/16/obama-i-feel-fabulous-ahead-of-debate-re?videoId=238465791&videoChannel=1 REUTERS

Oct. 16 - President Barack Obama is under pressure to perform superbly in the second presidential debate after Republican Mitt Romney's clear win in round one. Deborah Gembara reports.

marilena: Romney holding babies....ΤΙ ΈΧΕΙ ΠΑΘΕΙ ΑΥΤΟΣ ΜΕ ΤΑ...

marilena: Romney holding babies....ΤΙ ΈΧΕΙ ΠΑΘΕΙ ΑΥΤΟΣ ΜΕ ΤΑ...

Romney holding babies....ΤΙ ΈΧΕΙ ΠΑΘΕΙ ΑΥΤΟΣ ΜΕ ΤΑ ΜΩΡΑ?

Mitt Romney holds up a baby from the audience at a campaign rally at Cleveland State University in Ohio, March 2, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney holds a baby during a campaign rally at Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa September 7, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney hands six-month-old Dexter back to his mother after Romney held him for a photograph at a campaign stop in Eagan, Minnesota, February 1, 2012. REUTERS-Craig Lassig

Mitt Romney returns a baby to his mother in the audience at a campaign rally at Eastern Shipbuilding Group in Panama City, Florida, January 28, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney holds a baby onstage at a campaign stop at The Fish House in Pensacola, Florida, January 28, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney holds up five-week-old Johnathon Kelly after meeting with war veterans in Hilton Head, South Carolina, January 13, 2012. REUTERS-Jason Reed

Mitt Romney hands a baby back to his parents after posing for a picture as he meets with supporters at the Hall at Senate's End in Columbia, South Carolina, January 11, 2012. REUTERS-Jason Reed

Mitt Romney holds a baby in the audience at a campaign stop at Centro Incorporated in North Liberty, Iowa, December 28, 2011. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney lifts up 7-month-old baby Sarah Winnick during a campaign stop in Los Angeles, July 20, 2011. REUTERS-Lucy Nicholson

Mitt Romney holds the baby of a supporter during a campaign rally at the Port of Pascagoula in Pascagoula, Mississippi, March 8, 2012. REUTERS-Dan Anderson

Mitt Romney holds a baby up in the air after a campaign rally at the Golden Lamb in Lebanon, Ohio, October 13, 2012. REUTERS-Shannon Stapleton

Mitt Romney holds up a baby from the audience at a campaign rally in Lakeland, Florida August 31, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney holds a crying baby as he greets supporters at a campaign rally in Fairfax, Virginia September 13, 2012.   REUTERS-Jim Young

Mitt Romney passes a crying baby back into the crowd gathered outside the American Legion Post 176 in Springfield, Virginia September 27, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder

Mitt Romney holds up a baby at a campaign rally in Pueblo, Colorado, September 24, 2012. REUTERS-Brian Snyder